iTunes sets up shop in Bebo; CNN/YouTube sponsor presidential debate; Google Video search; social network privacy tested

The social web weekly: a quick-fire roundup of some of the news, announcements and conversations that have occurred throughout the week… iTunes sets up shop in Bebo. Apple has signed a deal with social network, Bebo, which sees the company selling digital music to the site's 8.

The social web weekly: a quick-fire roundup of some of the news, announcements and conversations that have occurred throughout the week…

  • iTunes sets up shop in Bebo. Apple has signed a deal with social network, Bebo, which sees the company selling digital music to the site's 8.8m users in the UK and Ireland. If the "experiment" goes well, the partnership could be extended to the whole of Bebo's user-base. The deal makes a lot of sense and signifies the first time Apple has shown any real interest in exploiting the growth of social networks. Thirty-two percent of Bebo's users are 16- to 24-year-olds, and Apple clearly sees this as an opportunity to wean this demographic off illegal downloads.
  • CNN, YouTube to co-sponsor presidential debate. The New York Times reports that YouTube and CNN are co-sponsoring a debate among the eight Democratic presidential candidates on July 23 in South Carolina. Many are already calling the US presidential race, the YouTube election, and it's great promotion for the video sharing site to get involved in something like this. It also further builds the case that YouTube isn't just a destination for copyright-infringing content, but has lots of legitimate user-generated content use and plays a wider democratising role.
  • Google Video now a search engine. Following its acquisition of YouTube, Google has finally re-invented Google Video as a search engine as well as remaining a video destination in itself. The new video search resembles the look of Google Image search (with a frame at the top), and spiders several video hosting services including YouTube, AOL, MySpace, MetaCafe, and Vimeo.
  • Social Networks' privacy to be tested. The MySpace generation use private messaging through social networking sites as a day-to-day substitute for email. But is it any more private than its older brother? Under the terms of service of sites like MySpace, user data is kept private uless called to be made public by law enforcers. And that's what could be about to happen in an emotional stress case where a judge is being asked whether the privacy features of MySpace and Facebook make communications there different from e-mails routed through Internet providers -- e-mails often routinely discoverable in civil matters.

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