Kazaa keeps rocking despite court case

Despite recent controversy surrounding the peer-to-peer file sharing program Kazaa, its distributor, Sharman Networks, has announced that enduring Australian rock band The Screaming Jets will debut their new EP this month via the software.Sharman Networks has been battling music copyright infringement charges instigated by Universal Music Australia for the past six months.

Despite recent controversy surrounding the peer-to-peer file sharing program Kazaa, its distributor, Sharman Networks, has announced that enduring Australian rock band The Screaming Jets will debut their new EP this month via the software.

Sharman Networks has been battling music copyright infringement charges instigated by Universal Music Australia for the past six months. The music industry is taking on Sharman over suspected illegal music file sharing occurring on the Kazaa software.

The company said today that The Screaming Jets are one of six local Australian bands that have decided to use Kazaa to launch their latest offerings. Other acts include the In the Grey, Kisschasy, Last Year's Hero, Something with Numbers and For Amusement Only.

According to Sharman, The Screaming Jets decided to distribute their album through the Kazaa program to further promote their new self-funded EP, which was released to coincide with their current Australian east coast tour.

Guitarist, Grant Walmsley, said the band is "excited" to try this new method of distribution.

"File-sharing is the new way for music to be heard and we're excited our fans can access our music through Kazaa," said Walmsley. "It's another way to continue our success and to connect to new and existing fans."

Fans can purchase individual songs from the new album for US50 cents each or the entire EP for US$2.50, Sharman said, adding that The Screaming Jets' music video, "Heart of the Matter," was available for free download.

Chief executive officer of Sharman, Nikki Hemming, said the addition of The Screaming Jets to the Kazaa repertoire is another "fantastic example" of artists using the software to promote their work.

"Australian artists and independent labels, like The Honey Palace and Below Par Records are making their mark globally by recognising that P2P is the most effective on-line mechanism to build and monetise a truly international fan base," she said.

Sharman's Australian Federal court case is still in the early stages of the discovery process and is expected to go to trial on 29 November this year.

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