Kid sells cloud startup to company even younger than he is...

Summary:High schooler created company addressing need for cloud-ready Perl Web apps, and the rest is already history.

Some platitudes spring to mind with this report: "Welcome to the 21st century," or "Only in (North) America:"

Daniil Kulchenko, 15, "recently sold his startup cloud-based computing company Phenona to ActiveState in a deal of undisclosed terms. Kulchenko intends to join Vancouver-based ActiveState in a strictly part-time role because he’s still finishing high school in Kenmore, WA. Pheona has not been launched publicly, but at the time of the sale ActiveState CEO Bart Copeland said the deal will help the company move into the field of cloud computing. ActiveState was founded in 1997, making the company just one year younger than its new employee..."

Geekosystem reports that Kulchenko started Phenona "after he worked a contract job where he found it difficult to use a Perl web app with the cloud, and couldn’t find an already existing service on the market to meet that need." Kulchenko, the article adds, "has been programming since the age of six with HTML, and became a freelance Linux administrator at age 11."

Time to get ready for the age of the "cereal entrepreneur"?

Topics: Start-Ups, Apps, Cloud, IT Employment, Linux, Operating Systems

About

Joe McKendrick is an author and independent analyst who tracks the impact of information technology on management and markets. Joe is co-author, along with 16 leading industry leaders and thinkers, of the SOA Manifesto, which outlines the values and guiding principles of service orientation. He speaks frequently on cloud, SOA, data, and... Full Bio

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