Kindle developers: Don't ask, don't tell

Summary:Hypothetically speaking, if I had received an invite to join the Kindle Development Kit for active content limited Beta program, which I didn't, and had read over the Terms and Conditions for the KDK, which don't officially exist, I wouldn't have seen this section.

Hypothetically speaking, if I had received an invite to join the Kindle Development Kit (KDK) for active content limited Beta program, which I didn't, and had read over the Terms and Conditions for the KDK, which don't officially exist, I wouldn't have seen this section:

You will not, without our prior written consent, use our trademarks, trade names or logos in any manner, or issue or contribute to any press release or any other public statement relating to the Program, our relationship with you or the terms or existence of this Agreement.

If such a policy existed, and I'm not saying it does or doesn't, it might prevent anyone from disclosing that they were even working on any Kindle apps. It's a good thing I'm not doing that. And I certainly wouldn't be able to share any source code examples or documentation from the KDK with you because the non-existent policy might say:

We will from time to time provide you access to certain software, documentation and related materials (the “Materials”) in our sole discretion. ... You will not use or authorize a third party to use any software in a manner that would in any way cause the Materials to be licensed free of charge, distributed in source code form or modifiable other than as expressly permitted in this Agreement.

It's really too bad the beta program doesn't exist because if it did I could tell you about the neat <redacted> feature, the fact that the whole thing is based on <redacted>, or the <redacted> limit of <redacted> KB/month. Wow, I can't believe nobody has reported on that yet.

So... what could we talk about instead? How bout 'dem Saints?

Topics: CXO, IT Employment, Software Development

About

Ed Burnette has been hooked on computers ever since he laid eyes on a TRS-80 in the local Radio Shack. Since graduating from NC State University he has programmed everything from serial device drivers and debuggers to web servers. After a delightful break working on commercial video games, Ed reluctantly returned to business software. He... Full Bio

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