Kodak gives cash for your old digital cameras, accessories, and other electronics

Summary:Kodak announces a new trade-in and recycling program for photo-related consumer electronics.

Surprisingly full-featured digital cameras regularly sell for $149 or less these days, so it's quite likely that many households have what I have: a drawer full of obsolete digital cameras and accessories. I have a tendency to hoard anything with a battery or LCD because I think I can pass it along to someone who could use it, but the gadgets in my drawer graveyard have gotten so long in the tooth that even my least tech-savvy relations turn their noses up at them (though not my father-in-law, who is is even more gravely afflicted and has whole roomful of expired electronics).

With ever more alarming news about the dangers of improperly disposed of electronic waste, though, it's getting harder to figure out what to do with those old cameras nobody wants. To help make things easier, many vendors have launched programs that let you recycle their old products for free or for a nominal fee.

Kodak's recently announced Trade-in and Recycling Program, however, does even better: Not only does the program accept non-Kodak products (including digital cameras and camcorders, printers, digital photo frames, and other accessories such as lenses and flashes), but it actually gives you cash in return. Just go to the Kodak Trade-In Center, register with your name, email, and phone number, and you can get an instant quote by entering the brand, model, and condition of your gear.

For instance, I entered a Canon PowerShot SD880 IS in excellent condition and got a quote of $26.64.  That's almost $9 more than what I was quoted at Gazelle.com, a Boston-based electronics trade-in service (for an SD880 IS with "no noticeable flaws, it looks like it has never been used" and all original accessories and software included).  I tried a few more camera models and found quotes from both sites to be similar, with Kodak offering a bit more on the whole, though Gazelle lets you get more specific about the condition of your camera.

Oh, and if you try to recycle that same PowerShot directly with Canon?  Not only do you not get cash for it, but the company also hits you up for a $6 recycling fee.

Topics: Hardware, Mobility

About

Janice Chen is an editorial consultant and has been covering technology for over two decades. Serving as editor in chief at CNET and Computer Shopper magazine for many years, she oversaw product coverage for the CNET and ZDNet websites. She has appeared on most of the major morning TV news programs and was featured weekly on CNN Headline... Full Bio

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