Lacey's Paper Round

Just when you thought the Web had run out of firsts up pops the Bank of England's Eddie George, to take part in a chat room. Steve Jobs makes the cover of Business Week again, the FT says that Intel evidence will hurt Microsoft in the DoJ trial, and corporations are going to have to start tightly policing the use of email says The Economist.

Just when you thought the Web had run out of firsts up pops the Bank of England's Eddie George, to take part in a chat room. Steve Jobs makes the cover of Business Week again, the FT says that Intel evidence will hurt Microsoft in the DoJ trial, and corporations are going to have to start tightly policing the use of email says The Economist. Did I miss something? If you read an interesting an item in print about the Web or computing send it me, Eugene Lacey, Editor in Chief of ZDNet UK. An exclusive ZDNet pen for every item published.

Eddie George takes his policies into cyberspace -- The Guardian

Governor of the Bank of England, Eddie George, took part in an online forum last week to prmote the bank's policies, reported The Guardian. On the euro he "hinted he was relieved not to be one of the central bank chiefs taking his country into the euro next year". --The Guardian, November 13, 1998

Gates vs DoJ will lead to tightening of corporate email use -- The Economist

The extensive use of email messages as evidence in the Microsodt vs US Department of Justice case is leading to a much tighter regime for employee email, writes The Economist. "More than 3,000 exhibits have been submitted in Microsoft's trial, and most of them consist of email... At Netscape, executives discussing delicate issues now use the telphone. Some times they even meet in person." -- The Economist, November 14, 1998

"Capitalism at work for consumers" Bill Gates -- Daily Telegraph

Bill Gates defended internal email discussions at Microsoft, which were being used against him in the MS Vs DoJ hearings. "The fact that there's some email here at Microsoft that says 'let's go beat up this guy'...there's nothing wrong with that. That is capitalism at work for consumers." -- The Daily Telegraph, November 13, 1998

Microsoft struggling to become a Web player -- Financial Times

Despite a huge investment Microsoft is failing to carve out market share in Web media. "Over the past few years the company has rejigged its strategy several times and swallowed an estimated $1bn in losses... Far from being the threat that justice Department officials had warned about, Microsoft has yet to prove that it can be an Internet leader." -- Financial Times, November 13, 1998

Psion gain from Gates fears over Symbian -- Fortune

According to Fortune magazine, the leaked MS memo which named Psion as significant threat to Windows CE pushed up the firms share price. "Psion's shares on the London exchange rose 8%" CEO David Potter is paraphrased by Fortune -- "A license for using EPOC will cost as little as $5 per device, vs. the reported $25 manufacturers are paying Microsoft for Windows CE." Microsoft refuses to comment on what it charges. -- Fortune, November 23, 1998

Pixar's ambitions to be leading digital studio are challenge -- Business Week

In yet another cover story for Steve Jobs, Business Week assesses the prospects for Pixa, the studio that made Toy Story. "Pixar's days as the only computerized show in town are over. Industrial Light & Magic is working on a Frankenstein remake. Fox will do Planet Ice, a computerized futuristic look at space travel that's also pegged for 2000. And then there's arch rival DreamWorks...that brought Antz to the screen on Oct 2". Pixar's next film, A Bug's Life has computer generated characters will "Up to 3,900 potential movements, vs 700 in Toy Story's characters." -- Business Week, November 23, 1998

Intel's testimony may damage MS the most -- Financical Times

The FT reported on the testimony of Intel's Steven McGeady. "Previous witness in the trial -- including Netscape and Apple Computer -- have been tainted by their historic rivalry towards the software giant." McGeady's "accusations that Microsoft abused its market power to intimidate Intel itself" will carry much more weight. But the world beating Wintel partnership will survive says Microsoft's Mark Murray: "This is a blip on the screen of our relationship." --Financial Times, November 1998

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