Lacey's Paper Round -- the week's best IT coverage in print

IT writers in the national press have been busy taking stock of 1998 in the last few days. We take stock of them taking stock, and report the worst bad news the press could possibly ever come across -- the euro was launched without too many problems.

IT writers in the national press have been busy taking stock of 1998 in the last few days. We take stock of them taking stock, and report the worst bad news the press could possibly ever come across -- the euro was launched without too many problems. Damn it to hell -- what use is that? Business Week provides further evidence that it is fast turning into a Silicon Valley trade journal -- as it names the Top 25 executives of 1998 with over half of them coming from the computer industry. Did I miss something? If you spot an interesting item about computers or the Net in the printed press drop me an email and tell me about it. I have an exclusive ZDNet pen for all entries published.

15 of Business Week's top 25 execs of 1998 work for tech firms -- Business Week

Business Week's love affair with Silicon Valley was confirmed by issue one of the new new year which named the top 25 executives of 1998. AOL's Steve Case, Apple's Steve Jobs, and Intel's Craig Brown were picked out for special praise, with over half of the executives chosen by Business Week writers working for tech firms. Click for full article Business Week, Jan 11, 1999.

Gates hired actors to poke fun at himself -- The Guardian

The Guardian chose an odd item about Bill Gates to adorn its front page last Wednesday. Reporting on a private rail jouney, in which Gates and guests crossed Wyoming and Montana in a specially chartered train. "At each stop, advance teams and bodyguards shuttled the holidaymakers to restaurants and resorts"..."at a restaurant, a couple of rowdy strangers joined in uninvited and proceeded to poke fun at the computer geek 'Hey aren't you that computer guy Steve Jobs?" they asked Mr Gates playfully'...It was only yesterday revealed that the chappies were actually actors, hired to provide some impromptu entertainment.". The Guardian, Wednesday 30, 1999.

Inter@ctive Week names five Net technologies and applications to watch in '99 -- Inter@ctive Week

The US magazine, Inter@ctive Week, has identified five hot technologes and applications to watch in 1999. They are (1) "Procurement -- It may not be sexy but it means big bucks on the Net." (2) Logistics -- "Web-based logistics - teh efficient scheduling of transportation, production and distribution of products - is expected to break out as one of the keys to competitiveness in 1999." (3) Data Mining -- "In 1999, data mining applications are expected to gain even more traction...Lary Goldman, customer relations service line director of Braun Technology Group, a Chicago sonculting firm, told Inter@ctive Week "Even if you don't, your competition is going to do it." (4) Virtual Private Networks -- "After many years of hype and promise, virtual private network (VPN) systems and services this year finally are expected to move from what one networking company executive calls 'kitchen experiments' to real-world deployments", (5)Network Telephony -- "The whole area of LAN (local area network) telephony will be very hot", says John Morency, vice president of network solutions at Renaissance Worldwide Inc., a consulting firm in Newton, Mass." Inter@ctive Week, Jan 4, 1998.

"No guarantee that things will follow the (euro) script" -- The Economist

The Economist reported on preparations for the euro, singling out Deutsche Bank for particular praise. "Deutsche Bank has conducted 59 separate trial runs, linking its computers with clearing systems around Europe"...Nobody in banking is sitting back yet though "As one apparently well-prepared banker from Salomon Smith Barney puts it: "You can be driving carefully, but if someone comes around the corner and smashes into you, there isn't much you can do." The Economist, January 2, 1999.

Ireland plots e-trade lead over the UK -- The Daily Telegraph

The Daily Teleraph reported on plans in Ireland to take a lead, as the main English-speaking e-commerce hub in the euro zone. "Britain's opt-out of the single currency has given Ireland the opportunity to become a hub for electronic commerce in Europe, Irish officials claim."..."Britain's loss will be Ireland's gain." The Daily Telegraph, Connected, December 31, 1998.

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