Larry Ellison touts Oracle's cloud platform, calls out SaaS vendors

Ellison also took a moment to apologize for missing this regularly-scheduled second keynote last year due to the America's Cup.

SAN FRANCISCO---Picking up where he left off on Sunday, Oracle executive chairman and CTO Larry Ellison continued to "drill down" the tech giant's cloud strategy.

After briefly acknowledging (and apologizing) for missing this regularly-scheduled second keynote last year due to the America's Cup , Ellison honed in on Platform-as-a-Service.

"In some areas, we're a pioneer, like in ERP," Ellison boasted."All of these applications and the productivity we've been able to achieve here at Oracle is because of this enormously powerful platform."

Ellison and company have been repeatedly stressing Oracle's commitment to the cloud over the last two and a half days, repeatedly stressing services at all three layers of the cloud.

Recalling Oracle's long journey to get here (which became more of a public journey with the debut of the Oracle Cloud in 2012), Ellison said the goal was to make moving existing Oracle databases and applications to the cloud as easy as the "push a button."

But it wasn't sufficient, Ellison admitted, just to move off-premise and onto the cloud.

"Most SaaS companies don't sell platform services," Ellison said. "The few that do don't offer you the same platform that they build on."

When you build on top of the platform (or at least move apps to the Oracle platform), Ellison affirmed the apps are encrypted and multi-tenant, meaning developers shouldn't have to change a "single line of code." This speaks to some of Oracle's favorite mantras, notably championing standards-based technology like Java and WebLogic.

"Pushing a button allows us to modernize your data without you having to do anything," Ellison promised. "This means your storage costs go down and performance goes up."

Oracle has also been pushing its platform as a one-stop shop in the face of other cloud competitors and SaaS providers -- notably Salesforce.com, SAP, and Workday.

"Most SaaS companies don't sell platform services," Ellison said. "The few that do don't offer you the same platform that they build on. Nothing against my friend Marc Benioff at Salesforce.com, but Salesforce builds on our platform."

To recall, Salesforce and Oracle inked a nine-year cloud services agreement in 2013, integrating their clouds at all three tiers of cloud computing: applications, platform and infrastructure.

Salesforce planned to standardize on the Oracle Linux operating system, Exadata engineered systems, the Oracle Database and Java Middleware Platform among other app integrations. The CRM giant also planned to tap Oracle's core technologies for powering its own applications and platform.

Ellison cited that 19 of the top 20 SaaS providers run SaaS apps on top of the Oracle database, from aforementioned Salesforce to NetSuite. Ellison has previously called out Workday as the only hold-out.

"Applaud if you like," he quipped.

Among a slew of other upgrades and debuts this week, Oracle's new Platform-as-a-Service is available immediately.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All