LED bulb replacements vie for spotlight at lighting show

Summary:Lot of intelligent and energy efficient technology news out of Philadelphia last week, the location for the annual LIGHTFAIR International show. Since this continues to be one of the least intrusive ways that many companies -- consumers -- are reducing their energy consumption, here are a few quick highlights of new technologies that got some attention during the conference.

Lot of intelligent and energy efficient technology news out of Philadelphia last week, the location for the annual LIGHTFAIR International show. Since this continues to be one of the least intrusive ways that many companies -- consumers -- are reducing their energy consumption, here are a few quick highlights of new technologies that got some attention during the conference.

It seems like I receive press releases about new "firsts" in the LED technology arena every week, let alone last week. But here are few of the notable developments timed around LIghtfair.

  • Royal Philips Electronics has introduced the Philips EnduraLED A21 17-watt bulb, which is intended to replace a 75-watt incandescent bulb. The bulb (pictured to the right) is supposed to reduce energy consumption by up to 80 percent while lasting about 25 times longer than your traditional product. The estimated savings over the lifetime of the bulb would be about $160, which is important to know because LED replacements continue to carry a higher price tag than what you and I are used to seeing. Although the price for this bulb, due to ship in the fourth quarter of 2011, isn't set, it is expected to be between $40 and $45 per bulb.
  • Another LED player, Lighting Science Group, has been showcasing the latest additions to its DEFINITY LED product line, which include floodlights and equivalents for 60-watt and 40-watt incandescent bulbs. This technology is approximately as energy-efficient as the Philips bulbs, and they are also dimmable, which is a big deal for those of us who appreciate mood lighting. You may not have heard of this company (yet), but it just got a big boost in the form of a partnership with Google for an Android-controlled LED bulb. In other words, it will be Internet-connected via Android devices.
  • Another company, Switch Lighting, has come out with what it calls the first 100 watt-equivalent LED bulb. What makes this possible is a "self-cooling environment" that allows the bulb to be brighter. The technology, which is an A19 lamp, is designed to produce 1700 lumens in neutral white (the same as you would get from halogen track lighting). I'm kind of wondering how Osram Sylvania feels about that "first" label, since it also is introducing a 100-watt replacement product (a 14-watt LED) that is dimmable and produces about 1500 lumens.

Topics: Android

About

Heather Clancy is an award-winning business journalist specializing in transformative technology and innovation. Her articles have appeared in Entrepreneur, Fortune Small Business, The International Herald Tribune and The New York Times. In a past corporate life, Heather was editor of Computer Reseller News. She started her journalism lif... Full Bio

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