Like frequent flyer points, but for energy reductions

This post is related to the "carrot" side of the carrot versus stick theory, suggesting that people need to be rewarded before they will substantially change their habits.If you or someone you know is already looking for ways to cut electricity consumption in your household, there is a site called MyEmissionsExchange.

This post is related to the "carrot" side of the carrot versus stick theory, suggesting that people need to be rewarded before they will substantially change their habits.

If you or someone you know is already looking for ways to cut electricity consumption in your household, there is a site called MyEmissionsExchange.com that wants to see that data. As you take action, not only will you save money on your electric bill directly, the site will recognize those reductions with carbon credits, which can be converted into the green stuff you like the most, cash.

As an example, if you decide to swap five 100-watt incandescent lightbulbs for compact fluorescents, not only will you save about $90 per year on power, you could earn $7.50 in credits. (You can have that money deposited directly into a PayPal account if you want.)

What's the fine print? As far as I can tell, there isn't any, unless you consider the fact that you have to cough up 12 months of electricity consumption data to participate a breach of your privacy. The exchange earns a brokerage fee on credits that are sold, which is how it makes money. (It is backed by OceanConnect, which is an energy brokerage.)

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