Linux development moving off proprietary tool

Summary:File this under Irony.Stephen Shankland reports development of the Linux kernel may slow because Linus Torvalds is having to abandon a proprietary tool called BitKeeper, which he'd used since 2002 to keep on top of things.

File this under Irony.

Stephen Shankland reports development of the Linux kernel may slow because Linus Torvalds is having to abandon a proprietary tool called BitKeeper, which he'd used since 2002 to keep on top of things.

BitKeeper had been offering a stripped-down free version to the Linux community, but pulled it after open source advocates began trying to replicate its capabilities in open source.

Larry McVoy

BitKeeper's keeper, Larry McVoy (right, from his personal page), gave this quote to Shankland. This is not an attempt to extract money from the open-source community. It's an attempt to protect our intellectual property. (McVoy has been making this point on kernel mailing lists for years.) >

Communications and changesets will move to e-mail until a new open source tool is created. Samba developerAndrew Tridgellis reportedly working on one called SourcePuller. >

What do you think? Should open source only be developed with open source tools? Has the community grown big enough to be politically correct in that way? Or has the open source community just cut off its nose to spite its face?

Let us know in TalkBack.

Topics: Open Source

About

Dana Blankenhorn has been a business journalist since 1978, and has covered technology since 1982. He launched the Interactive Age Daily, the first daily coverage of the Internet to launch with a magazine, in September 1994.

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