Managed Print Services: Paving the Way for a Leaner, Greener Fleet

But a surprising proportion of these companies are ignoring the elephant in the room: the huge amounts of paper and energy that are wasted by unnecessary or underutilized output devices. Without proper management, these print devices can be conspicuous consumers of energy, with a significant impact on a company's carbon footprint.

Doc believes strongly that most people or most companies will only adopt a new technology or service if it makes straightforward economic sense. Research has shown that less than 20% will pay a premium because something is better for the environment or has other positive social outcome.

But that doesn't mean it's not nice when something that makes economic sense also happens to be more socially responsible. And that's the case with Managed Print Services (MPS). First, you make the case based on economic benefits and cost savings, Then you get the side benefit of being more environmentally friendly.

So Doc was glad to see a recent article from Steven Swift in the British publication Business Computing World that outlines some of the environmental benefits that come along with MPS. Here is just a taste of the lengthy article:

It's hardly surprising in the present economic climate that companies are reviewing their IT budgets to establish where cost savings can be made. It is perhaps more surprising that relatively few people have ever stopped to consider the global environmental impact of their hardcopy output devices. For a growing number of companies, the environmental benefits make an MPS strategy an even more compelling proposition: for some, it's simply an added bonus to their cost-cutting initiatives; for others, it's the main attraction.

Growing awareness of climate change is making corporate sustainability strategies a powerful way to demonstrate to employees and shareholders that environmental issues are being taken seriously. Many companies have been quick off the mark when it comes to environmental initiatives, encouraging their employees to turn off lights when they leave the office, and use dishwash-safe glasses instead of disposable cups.

But a surprising proportion of these companies are ignoring the elephant in the room: the huge amounts of paper and energy that are wasted by unnecessary or underutilized output devices. Without proper management, these print devices can be conspicuous consumers of energy, with a significant impact on a company's carbon footprint.

Laser printers, fax machines, scanners and multi-functional devices all use electricity constantly, whether they are printing or not. The fuser – the technology inside of the device – rotates frequently in order to avoid deformation and has to maintain a minimum level of heat in order to print the first page of a print job quickly. When these devices are operating, they generate carbon emissions, as well as racking up the company's electricity bill.

Doc thinks a lot of companies ought to consider sustainability as a priority. But he also knows in these tough times the first priority is saving money. Read this article and you'll see how easy it is to do both! And you'll also see that the Brits spell a few things differently than we do here in the good-old USA. Printing in colour, anyone?

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