Microsoft to charge royalty fees to prevent Taiwanese OEMs from using Android in netbooks

Microsoft is turning to royalty fees in an attempt to prevent Taiwanese OEMs Acer and Asustek Computer from using Android and Chrome OS on netbooks.

Microsoft is turning to royalty fees in an attempt to prevent Taiwanese OEMs Acer and Asustek Computer from using Android and Chrome OS on netbooks.

DigiTimes has the scoop:

Microsoft plans to impose royalty fees on Taiwan-based vendors of Android handsets for using its patents in e-mail, multimedia and other functions, with Acer and Asustek Computer being targets in an actual attempt to prevent the two vendors from adopting Android and Chrome OS for their netbook and tablet PCs, according to Taiwan-based makers.

It seems that since Microsoft managed to squeeze a deal out of HTC to be able to use Microsoft patents in its handsets, this left Acer and Asustek in the firing line. The charge, which amounts to around $10-15 per device, is intended to dissuade vendors using the open-source platforms, according to the Taiwanese OEMs.

Microsoft asserts that the Android platform infringes on certain Microsoft patents, but as is always the case, the actual infringement is never clearly disclosed.

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