Mobility is a mixed source world

There are few opportunities out there for a closed source mentality. Of course, there are few out there for someone who is religious about open source, either. It's a mixed source world.

Mobile infrastructure vendor Urban Airship of Portland delivered 100 million messages before taking its first outside funding today, a $1.1 million injection from two Seattle venture capitalists.

But what CEO and co-founder Scott Kveton wants you to know about his four-man company is they're using open source.

"We take advantage of a lot of open source tools to do what we do. We couldn't have done this five years ago."

That's an unintended double entendre, albeit entirely clean. Phones like the iPhone made his business possible, but Kveton also wanted us to know open source tools were not as good back then.

(Yes, we're talking about 2005. Kelly Clarkson dominated the airwaves, Shrek 2 dominated the box office, people were still hanging on library wait lists for The DaVinci Code, and I was just starting here at ZDNet. Good times.)

"Our customers are asking for a way to do content delivery. In the case of the iPhone iTunes handles the transaction but the developer needs to deliver. There are many ramifications in that. Our storefront lets you get up and running quickly."

But in terms of software, "We can be open source on the client side and use open source tools."

It's a good message about how far open source has come. There are few opportunities out there for a closed source mentality. Of course, there are few out there for someone who is religious about open source, either.

It's a mixed source world.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All