Monochrome magic: Six printers tested

Who needs colour? Sometimes all you need is a black-and-white printer that can churn out the pages fast.



Who needs colour? Sometimes all you need is a black-and-white printer that can churn out the pages fast. We test your options.


Contents
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Colour printers are nice to have, but due to the cost of consumables they are still considered a luxury item in many medium-sized offices. And let's face it, not everyone in the company will need to print in colour. While mono printers don't have the same appeal, they can be the essential office workhorse printer being cheaper to purchase and run, with the capability to print at high speeds.

This month we have reviewed black-and-white printers from Brother, Fuji-Xerox, Minolta-QMS, Kyocera-Mita, Lanier, and Lexmark. We also invited other big-name vendors such as Canon, Ricoh, and Epson but unfortunately those companies chose not to submit this time.

After purchasing your printer, there are two main driver types you need to consider: PCL and Postscript. The PCL driver is the workhorse; printer speed tests are done in this mode. The PostScript driver is used when top quality is your priority. For example, you would use it to print PDF files or wherever a detailed professional finish is important. For testing purposes, the printers were set as network machines.

One thing of interest when testing mono printers is how they respond to colour input. First, the software has to convert each colour to greyscale. Second, the greyness is converted to a proportion of black to white and then printed as an array of black dots whose proximity to each other (or degree of overlap) increases with the required darkness -- this is the traditional "poster" printing.

Colour conversion varies with the printer driver -- for example, I noticed that the sky in our sample picture was far darker in PCL mode than in PostScript mode. The result is remarkably good since you won't see the individual dots without using a microscope -- 1200dpi is about 10 times the resolution discernible by the naked human eye (thus even 600dpi is quite adequate for most purposes).

If you are really interested in super-high resolution, some of these printers will claim 2400dpi capability using tricky dithering techniques -- personally I don't see the need. In truth, resolution is rarely an issue in printed material; of more concern is the evenness of ink spot placing and darkness. Often lines will appear -- particularly noticeable in photo and other pictures. However lines tend not to appear when using high-resolution paper, so you might consider using this for booklet front covers or other critical pages. A bit of experimentation will soon tell you what printer settings are most appropriate for your application.

Economics of printing
You will find that your printer has a toner saving mode. When using this mode, printing will not be as black, but it should be more than adequate for most purposes. Staff should be trained to use such features, particularly for draft documents that may never be seen by anyone but the original author. You can expect savings of around 30 percent when using economy mode.

While the toner itself is one aspect of printer economics, it is not the only consumable to consider. Drums and rollers also need periodic replacement. For example, the Brother HL-5060 requires a new drum after every 30,000 pages (at around AU$175 a pop). The Minolta-QMS PagePro 9100 requires AU$150 worth of rollers every 150,000 pages and a new fuser unit after 300,000 pages (at AU$265).

Allowing for toner price, this makes the Minolta's running costs roughly 30 percent cheaper per page than the Brother. On the other hand, the Minolta printer itself costs twice the going rate of the Brother. If you expect to have a very high volume of paper usage, the Minolta becomes very attractive, whereas the Brother would be better for relatively low printer use.

In other words, after about 400 reams of paper have been used the overall cost of printer and consumables will be similar for these two machines.

The medium-priced Kyocera EcoSys FS-1920 is even more frugal with consumables than the Minolta, though it's print quality is not as good.

Before you purchase a printer consider how much paper your office uses, and shop around -- you'll find a wide range of prices for consumables (and printers) if you hunt around on the Internet.

In the end, return on investment will be influenced by your usage rates.


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Brother HL-6050DN

Installation of this machine was a breeze. Driver installation and network attachment was a 10 or 15 minute process, the only trick is to do a custom installation in order to setup the PostScript driver. In terms of speed, this machine was on par with most of the others but it excelled in print quality and price -- it even has a built-in duplexer.

The toner cartridges are only rated at 7500 pages but the pricing is OK -- I guess it's no accident that they're sold in packs of three. Since the toner is a little more expensive than that of most of the other printers, it makes sense for this machine to service a smaller or lower paper usage office than its competitors.

An additional 500-page paper drawer is available and the two year on-site warranty is extendable to three years. The Brother has a very energy efficient sleep mode (11W) and can be connected to your computer via LAN, parallel, USB, and even has a wireless option.

Product HL-6050DN
Price AU$999
Vendor Brother
Phone 02 9887 4344, 03 9899 4844
Web www.brother.com.au
Ã, 
Interoperability
Good range of OSes and ports.
Futureproofing
Ã,½
Great for the smallish office.
ROI
Ã,½
Good value for relatively low usage.
Service
2-year on-site warranty (extendable).
Rating
Brother HL-6050DN


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Fuji-Xerox DocuPrint 240A-AP

Installation gave us a little trouble since the install program had an inoperative button, which meant that we had to look for the correct file and initiate it manually. The menus on the printer itself were easy enough to use.

The machine was average in terms of speed, but it slipped back a bit on quality. That is perhaps not entirely fair, however, as this machine did not ship with PostScript drivers -- this is an option for the Fuji, which is a bit rough considering the price.

Toner cartridges are average in price and lifespan. Maintenance kits work out very cheap but you may have trouble finding them if you look up suppliers on the Net (interestingly, I had no trouble finding suppliers for the faster 340A).

Up to two additional paper drawers are available, plus a duplexer. Warranty is for one year, on-site. Fuji Xerox does recycle cartridges and they claim that the reconditioned units are equal to the quality of new the product.

Product DocuPrint 240A-AP
Price AU$1754.50
Vendor Fuji-Xerox
Phone 1300 793 769
Web www.fujixerox.com.au
Ã, 
Interoperability
Good range of OSes, wireless would be nice.
Futureproofing
Extra trays and big HDD and RAM options.
ROI
Good for high volume usage.
Service
Ã,½
1-year on-site warranty (extendable).
Rating
Fuji-Xerox DocuPrint 240A-AP


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Minolta-QMS PagePro 9100

We had some difficulty setting the TCP/IP network connection automatically and ended up installing the Minolta-QMS machine as a local printer and later changing it to the network setting manually.

The Minolta was generally very good on quality. In terms of speed it was inconsistent; it easily rated the highest peak pages per minute, but was the slowest on average speed. This slowness was associated with a tendency to pause for a couple of seconds after printing two to four pages -- with no apparent pattern.

Options available include a duplexer, lower tray, and a four-bin sorter. This doesn't seem to be the best machine economically; the big 15,000-page toner cartridges are reasonably priced and the maximum power consumption is 1000W. On a more positive note the PagePro will accept A3-sized paper. The printer can be connected via parallel, USB, or network.

Product PagePro 9100
Price AU$1999
Vendor Konica Minolta
Phone 1800 265 687
Web www.printer-konicaminolta.com.au
Ã, 
Interoperability
Good range of OSes, wireless would be nice.
Futureproofing
Fair range of options.
ROI
Good for high volume usage.
Service
1-year return to base warranty.
Rating
Minolta-QMS PagePro 9100


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Kyocera-Mita EcoSys FS-1920

The menu system on the printer was a little hard to follow but not a real problem when we gave up and looked at the documentation. Again, it proved necessary to set up initially as a local printer and then manually adjust the settings for network operation. Speed-wise the EcoSys was typical of these machines, and it wasn't so good on quality -- it barely outperformed the DocuPrint in PCL mode, and in both cases it was the photo file that lost it points.

Kyocera claims that all consumables for this device are completely recyclable and a collection program does exist for these items. Options include: duplexer, five-bin sorter, and up to three 500-page drawers.

Toner is very cheap per page and comes in 15,000 page packages.

Kyocera is very carefully promoting a "green" image and the Ecosys is very economical in energy -- it uses only 11W on standby and 425W when printing. Parallel, USB2, and network connection are available.

Product Ecosys FS-1920
Price AU$1648.90
Vendor Kyocera Mita
Phone 1300 364 429
Web www.kyocera.com.au
Ã, 
Interoperability
Ã,½
Reasonable ports and OSes.
Futureproofing
Lots of extras available.
ROI
Ã,½
Very cost effective, but lower print quality.
Service
2-year on-site warranty (extendable).
Rating
Kyocera-Mita EcoSys FS-1920


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Lanier LP025n

The software installation for the Lanier was easy; network setup was automatic once the IP address has been entered into the printer I had no problems with the menus.

This machine was slightly ahead of the rest on average speed, and it was average in terms of maximum pages per minute. Despite being unable to print our large photo file in PostScript mode (due to lack of memory in the base model), the LP025n still managed to rate very well on print quality, equalling the PagePro and coming very close to the HL-6050DN.

Optional extras include an envelope feeder, up to two extra 500-sheet trays and, of course, duplex printing. Toner is rather expensive, although the machine price is average for those reviewed. And it's reasonably easy on electricity. Parallel port, USB2, and network options are available; it can also connect to your network via Bluetooth.

Product LP025N
Price AU$1599
Vendor Lanier
Phone 1300 362 345
Web www.lanier.com.au
Ã, 
Interoperability
Ã,½
Good of ports, OSes -- reasonable.
Futureproofing
Extra trays and good RAM/HDD options.
ROI
Toner is expensive.
Service
2-year NDOS warranty.
Rating
Lanier LP025n


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Lexmark E332n

Without an LCD display and menu system, setting up the network connection was a little fiddly but we worked it out eventually. The trick is to ask the printer what address it has by printing a status page and then matching the network to the printer address. We could then use the setup install software to reset the printer address according to our needs and return our network to its customary address.

The Lexmark fell a little behind most of the others on speed, but not disastrously so -- it still out performed the PagePro on average print speed. On quality, it fared similarly, slipping just behind the others. Having said that we don't want to suggest that the quality was terrible -- we were being picky.

Only one additional tray is available and there is no duplexing option -- apart from printing every second page, manually turning them over, and then printing on the back. Power-wise it is quite economical; it's as good as the EcoSys when printing but more typical of other printers in standby mode.

Toner-wise the E332n fares more poorly; it is easily the most expensive machine to run and still manages to retail as a higher price than the Brother, which is the next most expensive in running costs. Parallel, USB, and network connectivity are all standard, with serial and wireless options available.

Product E332n
Price AU$1171.50
Vendor Lexmark
Phone 02 9930 3500
Web www.lexmark.com.au
Ã, 
Interoperability
Good range of OSes and ports.
Futureproofing
Ã,½
Small office only.
ROI
Ã,½
Toner is very expensive.
Service
1-year return-to-base warranty.
Rating
Lexmark E332n

Specifications

Product HL-6050DN DocuPrint 240A-AP PagePro 9100
Vendor Brother Fuji Xerox Konica Minolta
Price RRP (incl. GST) AU$999.00 AU$1754.50 AU$1999.00
Warranty 2-year on-site / 3-year ext. 1-year on-site, 3-year ext. 1-year return to base
Phone 02 9887 4344, 03 9899 4844 1300 793 769 1800 265 687
Web www.brother.com.au www.fujixerox.com.au www.printer-konicaminolta.com.au
Weight (kg) 20.8 21 28
Size (mm) 400 x 425 x 310 422 x 404 x 465 539 x 448 x 423
LCD status/menu Yes Yes Yes
Power consumption (W) Printing:600W Standby:110W Sleep: 8W Printing:985W Standby:135W Sleep: 10W 1000W Max
Paper drawers/feeders 2 trays 2 trays 1 each
Paper capacity 500+100 550+150 500+200
Paper sizes A4, A5, B5, B6, Letter, Legal A4, A5, B5, B6, Letter, Legal Up to A3
Output/capacity 250 face down or 50 face up 500 sheets 500 sheets
Duplex printing Yes Optional Optional
Other add-ons 500 sheet tray 2x 550 page feeders, rear output tray Lower feeder, 4bin mailbox
Processor Aurora SPARClite (200MHz) PowerPC 603e/266MHz 250MHz RISC
Memory (base & expanded) 32MB std 160MB max 64MB std 576MB max 64MB SDRAM
OSes supported by drivers Windows, Mac, Linux Windows, Mac*, UNIX*, Linux*, *requires PS Novell, Windows, Mac, UNIX, Linux
Hard drive option Compact Flash 20GB Min. 1GB
Std. interface IEEE 1284 Parallel, USB2, Ethernet IEEE 1284, RS232C, USB, Ethernet USB, Parallel, Network
Optional interface 802.11b/g Wireless -- --
Performance (manufacturer specs) Ã,  Ã,  Ã, 
Max. print speed (ppm) 24 ppm (A4) 24ppm (A4) 35ppm (A4), 19ppm (A3)
Resolution 1200 x 1200dpi 1200 x 1200dpi, 9600 x 600dpi 1200 x 1200dpi
Postscript Yes Optional Yes
First page out (time) 11sec 10sec 10sec
Toner life (pages @ 5% coverage) 7500 10000 15000
Max. duty cycle N/A 75K pgs/mnth 150K pgs/mnth
Toner cost AU$129.00 AU$175.27 AU$235.00
Cents/page 1.72 1.75 1.57
Other consumables/pg 0.58 0.11 0.19
Total (cents/pg) 2.3 1.8627 1.756666667
Ã,  AU$999.00 AU$1754.50 AU$1999.00

Product Ecosys FS-1920 LP025N E332n
Vendor Kyocera Mita Lanier Lexmark
Price RRP (incl. GST) AU$1648.90 AU$1599.00 AU$1171.50
Warranty 2-year/900K pg on-site (ext.) 2-year NDOS 2-year on-site replacement
Phone 1300 364 429 1300 362 345 1300 362 192
Web www.kyocera.com.au www.lanier.com.au www.lexmark.com
Weight (kg) 13 14.0 10.0
Size (mm) 345 x 390 x 300 388 x 437 x 345 249 x 396 x 353
LCD status/menu Yes Yes No
Power consumption (W) Printing: 425W Standby: 11W Eco: 5.3 Max: 790W, Printing: 610W, Eco: 9W Printing:420W, Standby:80W, Eco:7W
Paper drawers/feeders 1 each 1 drawer 1 tray & manual feeder
Paper capacity 500+100 500 sheets 250 sheets
Paper sizes A4, A5, B5, Letter, Legal A4 SEF - A5 SEF A4, A5, B5, Letter, Legal
Output/capacity 250 sheets 250 sheets 150 sheets
Duplex printing Optional Optional No
Other add-ons 5 tray sorter, 3 extra 500 sheet trays Envelope Feeder, 2x 500 sheet trays 1x 550 sheet tray
Processor PowerPC 405/266MHz TX4955 310MHz 200MHz
Memory (base & expanded) 32MB std. 288MB max 64Mb (std) 320Mb (max) 32MB std 160MB max
OSes supported by drivers Windows, Mac Windows, Mac Windows, Mac, UNIX, Linux
Hard drive option 1GB 6GB --
Std. interface Parallel, USB2, MIC Bi-directional Parallel, Ethernet Bidirectional Parallel, USB2, Ethernet
Optional interface Ethernet, RS-232C IEEE1394 (Win), Bluetooth Serial, 802.11 Wireless
Performance (manufacturer specs) Ã,  Ã,  Ã, 
Max. print speed (ppm) 28ppm (A4), 25ppm (A4) 26ppm (A4)
Resolution 1800 x 600dpi 1200 x 1200dpi 1200 x 1200dpi
Postscript Yes Yes Yes
First page out (time) 9.5sec 7.5sec 8sec
Toner life (pages @ 5% coverage) 15000 (7500 starter) 15000 6000
Max. duty cycle 125K pgs/mnth 150K pgs/mnth 15K pgs/mnth
Toner cost AU$167.20 AU$373.00 AU$171.00
Cents/page 1.11 2.49 2.85
Other consumables/pg 0.24 0.2 0.31
Total (cents/pg) 1.35 2.686666667 3.16
Ã,  AU$1648.90 AU$1599.00 AU$1171.50


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

How we tested

Interoperability
What operating systems, hardware platforms, and networking protocols are there?

Futureproofing
What is the maximum amount of RAM you can install on each printer? Its paper-handling options?

ROI
Initial cost of the printer and replacing consumablesvs print quality and speed.

Service
What is the length of warranty and the support hours?

Print Speed
For the speed tests, printers were set to PCL mode at 600dpi. We used plain paper. Each printer was linked to the computer via a 100Mbit switch. The computer itself had a 2.8GHz Pentium 4 processor and 256MB RAM. The operating system was Windows XP Professional. Software used was Microsoft Office.

Peak pages per minute benchmark:
A 30-page, plain text document, of typical type coverage, was printed on each machine. The timing does not include lead time to first page. We use the following formula:

PPM = (60 / (time to print 30 pages - time to first page)) * 29

Average pages per minute benchmark:
This time a 20-page document was printed. It contained various fonts at different colours and sizes along with, columns, simple graphics and photos. Lead time to first page is included. Formula:

PPM = (60 / (time to print 20 pages)) * 20

Print Quality
Printers were set to 1200dpi PostScript mode for these tests with two notable exceptions. The sample machine from Lanier did not have the memory capacity to deal with the 50MB photo file. The Docuprint from Fuji Xerox did not have a PostScript driver -- this is an optional extra.

Plain paper was used for each test. I should note that many of the faults in quality noticed in the printing would likely have been alleviated by the use of high resolution paper. The PDF files were naturally printed from Adobe Acrobat and the TIF picture file was printed from Paint.

Fontkey.pdf
Here we look at the printer's ability to accurately form fonts at various sizes ranging from 48pt to 4pt. The sample document contained both Times New Roman and Gaudy Handtooled fonts. We looked for smooth lines and curves, spatter, smoothness of ink distribution under magnification, and overall appearance with the naked eye.

Laserkey.pdf
Linear and curved greyscales (both discrete and spectral) were observed for smoothness and shade consistency. Fine lines, curved horizontal, and oblique, were judged for accurate spacing and smoothness. Observation was by the naked eye.

Photo
A large (~50MB) TIF image was used for this test. The image was a composite, showing a range of colours, textures, and shading. It included sky and water, plants and a baby, bone, glass, and weathered wood. The image was viewed by eye for gradient smoothness, accuracy of fine detail, darkness and lines, and dithering in low contrast areas.


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Case study: Barclays hires EDS, Xerox for services

EDS and Xerox Corporation have signed a AU$452.2 million contract with Barclays Plc in the UK to supply its Workplace Management Services solution, which will deliver fully managed office document services for print, copy, and fax on a price-per-page basis.

EDS' Workplace Management Services solution is a key component of the company's Agile Enterprise Platform strategy. Under the terms of the Barclays' contract, EDS is working with Xerox, a member of the EDS Agility Alliance, to provide Barclays with Managed Output Services. Managed Output Services is a co-branded EDS and Xerox offering that integrates advanced IT and document management tools and expertise with a Six Sigma-based methodology to reduce overall print spend while improving productivity.

Through this offering, EDS and Xerox will manage Barclays' procurement, service and maintenance, helpdesk and user support for more than 2250 Xerox and other devices across nearly 200 Barclays Group Office sites in the UK. In addition, a team of Xerox DocuCare professionals -- on-site personnel who handle preventive maintenance and first-level service activities on all customer devices -- will be dedicated full time to Barclays, at their new world headquarters in London.

The five-and-a-half-year contract expands the services that EDS currently provides to Barclays as part of an existing seven-year, AU$456.7 million IT services agreement signed with the bank in June 2003. Under that agreement, EDS supports 41,700 desktop seats across the various businesses of the Barclays Group. At the time it was the largest-ever desktop services agreement in the retail banking sector.

The agreement will enable Barclays to deliver tailored print, copy, and fax services to approximately 40,000 users across Barclays' UK campus sites, while managing service requirements and costs at both individual user and departmental levels. Robust service level agreements will underpin the quality of service experienced by Barclays' users.


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

Look out for...

Speed: when a printer claims up to 30 pages per minute it is speaking of ideal conditions -- standard resolution, PCL mode, no pictures, one font at a single size, and no other fancy formatting. Such features could bring your average print speed down markedly.

Quality: will your printer be used to produce professional looking documents for circulation to your clients and vendors? Make sure PostScript, or equivalent, drivers are available and, if possible, ask to see a sample of the output.

Total Cost: consider not only the initial outlay of purchasing the machine, but look at the warranty period and the cost per page of consumables (toner, fusers, rollers). An expensive machine might work out cheaper long term. The six printers in this review varied in usage costs from under 1.5Ã,¢ per page to over 3Ã,¢ (excluding the paper itself).

Paper Capacity: if your office goes through a lot of paper, a one ream paper capacity is probably not adequate -- you will be loading the printer all to often. Check to see how many optional drawers are available. (Similarly, look for high capacity toner cartridges.) Ensure that the paper sizes you use are supported.

Expansion Options: besides extra paper drawers, you might need greater memory capacity (RAM and or a hard drive), duplexer, multiple output bins or an envelope feeder. Not all printers in this class have all these options. Consider also what all these extras cost!

Final words

Before you grab your chequebook and rush off to your local peripheral supplier, make a few notes for yourself first. Firstly, roughly work out your monthly printing load in terms of pages. Second, rank in order of importance to your situation: Price, print quality, and speed. Third, note any other details that might be critical to your situation, such as the need for Linux printer drivers or A3 paper capacity.

You must consider all your needs now and consider what your needs may be in 12 months time.

This article was first published in Technology & Business magazine.
Click here for subscription information.>


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

T&B Editor's choice
Editor's choice

Brother HL-6050DN for small offices, and Konica Minolta PagePro 9100 for large offices As usual, the choice comes down to user priorities as much as the integral quality of the product. We must assume that price is a major consideration, yet print quality and flexibility will certainly be serious factors in many situations.

For a smaller office, the Brother HL-5060DN is a good choice as it has lots of features and great print quality. Where it falls down is on the price of consumables, but for relatively low usage rates it offers good value for money having the lowest initial outlay.

For an office with heavier printing needs, the Kyocera EcoSys and the Konica-Minolta PagePro are both worthy of consideration. In terms of economics and add-ons the Kyocera is a clear winner, unfortunately it wasn't stunning in terms of print quality. The PagePro is quite appreciably better in this regard -- mind you it takes its time to do a good job, although it is also capable of very fast text printing.

It should also be noted that Kyocera only make drivers for Windows and MacOS operating systems. Given its flexibility and quality, the PagePro is a very good choice, but the Kyocera cannot be ruled out as an economical option.

As for the scenario below, when you need plenty of printing done with low long-term running costs, the winner is the Kyocera-Mita. It is quite fast and very inexpensive to run. It's failing is lower print quality, although it is quite adequate for most purposes.


Contents
Introduction
HL-6050DN
DocuPrint 240A-AP
PagePro 9100
EcoSys FS-1920
Lanier LP025n
Lexmark E332n
Specifications
How we tested
Case study
Look out for...
Editor's choice
About RMIT

About RMIT IT Test Labs

RMIT IT Test Labs
RMIT IT Test Labs is an independent testing institution based in Melbourne, Victoria, performing IT product testing for clients such as IBM, Coles-Myer, and a wide variety of government bodies. In the Labs' testing for T&B, they are in direct contact with the clients supplying products and the magazine is responsible for the full cost of the testing. The findings are the Labs' own -- only the specifications of the products to be tested are provided by the magazine. For more information on RMIT, please contact the Lab Manager, Steven Turvey.

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