New Jersey company debuts solar-powered electric vehicle charger

Summary:The SunStation from Princeton Satellite Systems can charge two electric vehicles at a time.

SunStation

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about an integrated electric vehicle charging system that is powered by a wind turbine. Now, it's the sun's turn.

New Jersey company Princeton Satellite Systems has designed a system called SunStation that relies on solar photovoltaic panels to charge the batteries on electric vehicles using a 240-volt AC connection.

There is conflicting information about how fast it will take for the technology to do its job.

The smallest system, which will cost about $27,000, uses four solar panels and can charge a 1.6-kilowatt battery in about 10 hours, according to local news coverage about the technology.

A larger configuration will be priced at about $55,000. That one will be able to fully recharge a Nissan Leaf in about eight hours, a Chevy Volt in four, and a Toyota Prius Plugin Hybrid in one and a half, according to the Princeton Satellite Systems Web site.

The company expects to sell the technology, which should be available within the next three months, to parking lot and mall operators. It also envisions the technology as a potential source of emergency power and as a booster for local electric grids. Princeton Satellite will use a wireless network to handle the payments and monitor the status of connected SunStations.

Topics: Emerging Tech

About

Heather Clancy is an award-winning business journalist specializing in transformative technology and innovation. Her articles have appeared in Entrepreneur, Fortune Small Business, The International Herald Tribune and The New York Times. In a past corporate life, Heather was editor of Computer Reseller News. She started her journalism lif... Full Bio

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