No strain, no gain

Summary:As if we don't have enough to worry about, there's a new crisis in the offing. A report making the rounds predicts that we'll soon be straining the capacity of our networks, which may be unable to handle the rising tide of XML and Web services messages.

As if we don't have enough to worry about, there's a new crisis in the offing. A report making the rounds predicts that we'll soon be straining the capacity of our networks, which may be unable to handle the rising tide of XML and Web services messages. Analysts at ZapThink estimate that XML traffic will triple on enterprise networks by 2008, accounting for close to 50% of the messages sent. XML messages are bulky and put a strenuous load on network pipes. The solution? ZapThink sees hope in deployment of binary XML, for one.

The problem is that binary XML, while suitable for many situations, takes away one of the supreme advantages of Web services coding and text-based XML, which is the fact that it is human readable.

It's also highly probable that Moore's Law will kick in here as well, and new hardware will handily keep up or surpass the requirements of handling more bloated XML traffic. The catch is, of course, that more investments will have to be made in updated network gear and platforms. But, we've all been down this road many times before. After all, we even now have computers that can run Windows XP, don't we?










Topics: Browser

About

Joe McKendrick is an author and independent analyst who tracks the impact of information technology on management and markets. Joe is co-author, along with 16 leading industry leaders and thinkers, of the SOA Manifesto, which outlines the values and guiding principles of service orientation. He speaks frequently on cloud, SOA, data, and... Full Bio

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