NSW lock laws picked ahead of Ruxcon

NSW legislative reform set to crack down on unregistered individuals in possession of lock-picking tools might take the shine off golden tickets to the Ruxcon security event next month.

NSW legislative reform set to crack down on unregistered individuals in possession of lock-picking tools might take the shine off golden tickets to the Ruxcon security event next month.

Lockpick

Lock pick image, by Robert Baird, CC 2.0

The IT security event will play host to a much-anticipated training session where delegates will be taught the art of lock-picking.

A similar event was held for the first time at this year's AusCERT security conference, where a small, closed room of delegates was taught how to open a variety of locks. Several lock-picking tool sets were also sold.

It is, however, illegal in NSW, Queensland and Western Australia to be in possession of a lock pick without a locksmith licence, according to the Locksmiths Guild of Australia.

The guild said that amendments to NSW security legislation will bolster enforcement of the laws, which remains either difficult or relaxed in other states.

"Legislation changes are now underway and its going to get a lot tougher," the guild said. "It has been hard to pin down unregistered lock pick owners because they float around."

In NSW, security laws regulating lock picks are enforced through the police service, but are handled through different government bureaucracies in other states.

Lock-picking courses, or villages as they are known, are common in security conferences across the United States and Europe, and are appearing at Australian events.

Ruxcon is held on November 20 and 21 in Melbourne.

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