Only 7% of physicians keep electronic health records

Patients' care may be adversely affected by missing information in as many as 220 mln patient visits each year, according to Journal of the American Medical Association. Clinicians estimated that the missing information was likely to adversely affect the patient's medical care and could cause delayed care or redundant services 60% of the time.

Patients' care may be adversely affected by missing information in as many as 220 mln patient visits each year, according to Journal of the American Medical Association. Clinicians estimated that the missing information was likely to adversely affect the patient's medical care and could cause delayed care or redundant services 60% of the time. In 45% of the visits, the clinician reported spending five or more minutes unsuccessfully searching for the information, time that could have been spent with the patient. Only about 7% of physicians, physicians' assistants, and nurse practitioners reported having full EHRs (electronic health records), but this group was 60% more likely to have complete information. Doctors' offices in rural areas, which tend to rely on a smaller number of vendors for laboratory results, were 48% more likely to have complete information.

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