Samsung ships fast 2Gb DDR3 memory

Summary:The South Korean company, Samsung Electronics said on Thursday it had begun shipping what it claimed were the first high-density, 2Gb DDR3 memory modules using 50nm technology.Designed for use in servers, the range available, include a 16GB inline memory module and an 8GB registered dual inline memory module (RDIMM).

The South Korean company, Samsung Electronics said on Thursday it had begun shipping what it claimed were the first high-density, 2Gb DDR3 memory modules using 50nm technology.

Designed for use in servers, the range available, include a 16GB inline memory module and an 8GB registered dual inline memory module (RDIMM). Last year, Samsung used 50nm technology in 2Gb DDR3 module in PC applications.

DDR3 RAM memory is technically known as double data rate three, dynamic random access memory and is used in storage applications that require a high-bandwidth so that they can operate more quickly.

Part of the synchronous dynamic random access (SDRAM) family of chip technologies DDR3 is an improvement over its predecessor SDDRAM 2 as it can transfer twice the data rate so that the memory bus is faster and it supports higher peak rates.

However, even as the performance of memory continues to improve the semiconductor market is having a difficult time because the price of DRAM is falling. According to the analysts, Gartner, the industry is facing a consecutive decline in annual revenues for the first time in its history.

Worldwide semiconductor revenue for 2009 is forecast to total $219.2bn (£142.7bn) — a 16.3 percent decline from 2008 revenue, Gartner said in December. The decline between 2007 and 2008 was 4.4 percent.

"This market was originally forecast to do a modest loss and then revenues fell off a cliff," said Andrew Norwood, a research vice president at Gartner at that time. "Next year, we get the full brunt of the downturn."

Topics: After Hours

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Colin has been a computer journalist for some 30 years having started in the business the same year that the IBM PC was launched, although the first piece he wrote was about computer audit. He was at one time editor of Computing magazine in London and prior to that held a number of editing jobs, including time spent at the late DEC Compu... Full Bio

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