Study highlights bias in desktop IT procurement in Brazil

Summary:Most government tenders mention preference to Intel processors

The vast majority of IT tenders in the Brazilian public sector for desktop computers mention a clear preference to Intel processors, according to a study that analyzed hundreds of bid documents.

According to a consulting firm IT Data provided to website Convergência Digital, only 11 out of 930 tenders analyzed did not make any mention to specific brands and models of computers that would be the preferred option, as well as type of the architecture, CPU cache memory and other processor-related features.

The document also mentions there are direct mentions to Intel in about 40 percent of tenders. This compares to a 0.8 percent of mentions to AMD in the bid documents.

"The analysis highlighted worrying aspects [of procurement] that can effectively result in wasted public resources, as well as a negative impact on the national IT industry and strategic risks to the country. A high percentage of the tender documents makes direct mentions to brands, models and/or incorrect or incoherent use of technical aspects," the document says.

It is understood that the difference in pricing between Intel and AMD products is about 30 percent, according to the document.

The news of a possible bias towards Intel-based desktops emerges as the government announced that it will launch a multi-departmental tender for 75,000 computers in the next few weeks.

Topics: Processors, PCs

About

Angelica Mari is ZDNet's Brazil Contributing Editor. She has relocated to Brazil, her home country, in 2011 after living and working in Europe for a decade. She started her professional life when she was 14, as a software trainer coaching executives at major Brazilian companies until the age of 17, when she started writing professionally.... Full Bio

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