Stuxnet worm strike Iranian nuclear plant

Iran's official news agency said a sophisticated computer worm purportedly designed to disrupt power grids and other such industrial facilities had infected nuclear power plant computers.

Iran's official news agency said today that a sophisticated computer worm purportedly designed to disrupt power grids and other such industrial facilities had infected computers at the country's first nuclear-power plant but had not caused any serious damage.

The Stuxnet worm, which some see as heralding a new era of cyberwarfare, appeared in July and was already known to be widespread in Iran. In fact, its high concentration there, along with a delay in the opening of the Bushehr plant, led one security researcher to hypothesize that Stuxnet was created to sabotage Iran's nuclear industry.

In addition to emphasizing the threat posed by the worm, which could be used to remotely seize control of industrial systems, today's news could well add to speculation about Stuxnet, the sophistication of which has caused some to suspect that a nation state, such as Israel or the U.S., might be behind its creation. The worm exploits three holes in Windows, one of which has been patched, and targets computers running Siemens software used in industrial control systems.

For more of this story, read Stuxnet worm hits Iranian nuclear plant on CNET News.

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