Sydney's disadvantaged get free computer training and Web access

Disadvantaged Sydneysiders have been given a chance to learn new computer skills and gain free access to the Internet with the newly announced "BootUp Internet Cafés" initiative.The initiative is a partnership between the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Rotary Club of Sydney Cove and the city government.

Disadvantaged Sydneysiders have been given a chance to learn new computer skills and gain free access to the Internet with the newly announced "BootUp Internet Cafés" initiative.

The initiative is a partnership between the Australian Computer Society (ACS), the Rotary Club of Sydney Cove and the city government. The first café to be rolled out is located in Woolloomooloo's Juanita Nielsen Leisure Centre.

BootUp Internet Café is a not-for-profit organisation which aims to "lift the morale of the underprivileged members of the community by increasing their access to skills and job opportunities".

The Internet café also allows those without access to the Internet -- particularly homeless youth, unemployed and older members of the community -- to stay in contact with their family and friends via a free e-mail service.

The ACS is providing funding and training resources for the program, including programs featuring the International Computer Driver's Licence (ICDL) -- a program that certifies participants in the use of personal computers and common computer applications.

BootUp Internet Cafés are built to seat four users and come with PCs, LCD screens, printer, scanner and the required software. The cafés can be installed, Internet ready and operational in a few hours.

BootUp manufactures and installs the workstations with local volunteer partners providing electricity, an Internet connection and supplies, and covering the monthly Internet provider charge.

With the help of project partners, Ed Ackman, founder of BootUp Internet Café, plans to install 10 more cafés in inner Sydney in the coming year.

"BootUp Internet Cafés are a great example of the corporate community and government coming together to support the less privileged. Because this group always seem to get someone's worn out cast-offs, we were determined to keep everything brand new, and to a standard they would find in the real corporate world. Everything has been purchased from private donation and provides companies with great opportunities to help fund the development of the BootUp project," Ackman said.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All