The new Botox

Wait until Joan Rivers (right) and her plastic surgery loving friends hear the good news about Efudex. Or Carac. Both are brand names for fluorouracil, a drug designed to treat pre-cancerous lesions on the skin by chemically burning them off. It also burns off wrinkles.

Remember Botox?

Sure you do. Once called "sausage poison," it was a craze early this decade for treatment of wrinkles, until women realized it froze their faces, at which point it became the butt of jokes. The new thing in high society is snake venom.

Wait until Joan Rivers (right) and her plastic surgery loving friends hear the good news about Efudex. Or Carac. Both are brand names for fluorouracil, a drug designed to treat pre-cancerous lesions on the skin by chemically burning them off.

It also burns off wrinkles.

A study at the University of Michigan (Go Wolverines) found that one side-effect of the treatment is to reduce the appearance of wrinkles.

The drug works by burning off the outer layers of skin. The lesions drop off with the dead skin. But the skin underneath, while red and new, is also unlined.

Anyone familiar with pictures of Sen. John McCain's face during last year's campaign can see the effect. Remove a lesion on the surface of the skin and what remains is red, but unlined.

And don't forget the side-effects -- burning, discoloration of the skin, itching, pain.

Personally I'll take the wrinkles.

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