These eco homes are a work of art

Damien Hirst, the controversial, wealthy British artist whose pieces include a shark's head suspended in formaldehyde, is turning his attention to preserving something else - the environment.

Ilfracombe. Photo from Apringstone via Wikimedia.

Damien Hirst, the controversial, wealthy British artist whose pieces include a shark's head suspended in formaldehyde, is turning his attention to preserving something else - the environment.

Hirst has unveiled plans to build 500 eco homes in the British seaside town of Ilfracombe, according to This is North Devon magazine. The houses will feature wind turbines concealed in the roofs, solar panels, and more than your usual insulation, architect Mike Rundell of MRJ Rundell Associates says in the article.

Ilfracombe is on the north coast of the county of Devon, in the part of England that juts out to the southwest. Hirst  - reputedly the world's richest living artist - lives in the area and owns about half the land on which the houses would stand.

He wants the development to underpin regeneration, create a new gateway to the town, and serve as a blueprint for sustainable housing, the article states. The houses would echo the area's architectural features, including "pitched roofs, bay windows, smart gable ends,  short terraces and robust materials used in a decorative manner," according to Rundell.

"Damien also wants each house to be practical, make the most of natural light, be big enough to live in well, and boast spectacular views," Rundell says. "It's our ambition to make them affordable but houses like these are more expensive than ordinary houses. I couldn't tell  you specifically how much we are talking about."  The housing market in that part of the UK has come under criticism for prices that are out of reach for local people, and that are instead geared toward flush out-of-town buyers.

Hirst could apply for planning permission within six months, and building could start next year.

Map image from Ordnance Survey via Wikimedia.

Building an eco future on SmartPlanet:

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All