To this FCC, crowd-cussing and bare breasts are 21.67 times as bad as Net neutrality violations

The Hollywood Reporter notes that the Federal Communications Commission has asked broadcasters for "numerous" tapes from broadcasters that could include vulgar remarks uttered at live sporting events from coaches, athletes and even unruly spectators.

The Hollywood Reporter notes that the Federal Communications Commission has asked broadcasters for "numerous" tapes from broadcasters that could include vulgar remarks uttered at live sporting events from coaches, athletes and even unruly spectators. 

The trade paper reported that the FCC requested tapes of some 30 live broadcasts from football games where participants or crowd members apes requested by the commission include live broadcasts of football games and NASCAR races where the participants or the crowds let loose with an expletive.

Like, say, a group of partisan fans out in the cheap seats uttering a barnyard expletive when they felt that  football receiver, called out of bounds at the back of the end zone, had both feet in bounds and should have been credited with a touchdown.

The fine: as much as $325,000 for each instance. Credit it to provisions enacted by the brief breast-baring wardrobe malfunction committed by Janet Jackson during the Super Bowl.

Now this is the same FCC that says that well, if broadband Internet service providers block competing VoIP services, they will come down on them, too. To back that up, defenders of this FCC (and opponents of more codified and rigorous net neutrality standards) like to point out the FCC's $15,000 fine against Madison River for blocking VoIP calls.

Summing up, Harper's Index-juxtaposition style:

FCC fine for blocking VoIP: $15,000.

Maximum FCC fine for airing a quick "boo sheet" chant from some drunken fans: $325,000. 

So in the FCC's bizarre world where deliberate, net neutrality-subverting technical malfunctions are OK but wardrobe malfunctions (a la Justin and Janet) are a mortal sin, nanoseconds of boobs-flash and cussing is 21.67 times more of a sin against the public good than subverting competing Internet services. 

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