Toshiba may be releasing 3D TVs that don't require glasses soon

Summary:Toshiba is planning to release 3D TVs that don't require the use of 3D-enabled glasses, possibly by the end of the year.

One of the biggest drawbacks to 3D televisions is the usual requirement that all viewers need a pair of 3D glasses to enjoy the entertainment. This works for a few people, usually the owners of the home theater set-ups who either bought a pair of frames or two, or the spectacles came within the box. But what if you want to watch Alice in Wonderland in 3D at home with a large group? That could present a problem.

That problem could be alleviated with the news that Toshiba is planning to release 3D TVs that don't require the use of 3D-enabled glasses, possibly by the end of the year.

In case you're wondering about how it will be possible to watch 3D media without the need of glasses, here's how. Using a new integral imaging system, the HD displays will emits rays of light at different angles allowing 3D images to be seen with the naked eye from multiple viewing positions.

The plan includes launching three models, including a 21-inch display, during the holiday shopping season. However, given that the report says that the screens will monitor for "several hundred thousand yen," it is likely these TV sets will only be available in Japan during the holiday season and not arrive on our shores until much later.

Topics: Toshiba

About

Rachel King is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in San Francisco, covering business and enterprise technology for ZDNet, CNET and SmartPlanet. She has previously worked for The Business Insider, FastCompany.com, CNN's San Francisco bureau and the U.S. Department of State. Rachel has also written for MainStreet.com, Irish Americ... Full Bio

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