Tuesday

Tuesday 19/11/2002Of course, if you really do want to be arrested for illegal broadcasting from your home network, the best way to go about it is to move some MP3s around. I'm surprised that nobody's suggested that FAST build a few detector vans and start to skulk around a few dark alleyways, sniffing the air and looking for the signature of unauthorised software to waft past on the waves.

Tuesday 19/11/2002
Of course, if you really do want to be arrested for illegal broadcasting from your home network, the best way to go about it is to move some MP3s around. I'm surprised that nobody's suggested that FAST build a few detector vans and start to skulk around a few dark alleyways, sniffing the air and looking for the signature of unauthorised software to waft past on the waves. As from tomorrow, the rules change -- if you have any unlicensed software on your PC at work, the police can seize everything technical in the entire company and take it away. That'll go down well -- and if you think they're going to restrict their activities to companies, well, why should they? Although it's hard not to get a certain warm glow from the rumour that next year, FAST is going to concentrate on what is apparently the biggest hotbed of non-compliance in the commercial world -- and no, it's not dodgy retailers, journalists or estate agents. Lawyers and accountants are in the cross-hairs, apparently, for their cobbler's children approach to sticking to the letter of the law. Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch, and it has the added bonus that the best way to get an unjust law changed is to apply it to the lawyers. Expect some high profile lawsuits fought all the way to Europe, as disgruntled legal eagles object to having their nests denuded of everything from the wires in the wall to the fax machine in the postroom.

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