Twitter COO Adam Bain leaves the company

Current finance chief Anthony Noto will take over Bain's COO duties. It's not immediately clear if any other executives have been shuffled amid Bain's departure.

Twitter's chief operating officer Adam Bain announced via tweet that he's leaving the company.

Current finance chief Anthony Noto will take over Bain's COO duties, temporarily handling both top jobs until a permanent CFO replacement is found. It's not immediately clear if any other executives have been shuffled amid Bain's departure.

In a regulatory filing, Twitter said Noto will continue to run the company's all-important live video efforts, while also overseeing revenue, global sales and partnerships, and business development.

Bain has been with Twitter for six years and is largely credited with scaling the company's lucrative ad business. He was appointed to the position of COO last October, around the time Jack Dorsey regained his role as chief executive.

Before Bain took over, the position had been vacant for more than a year following the departure of Ali Rowghani, who left amid a previous executive shuffle stemming from issues with lackluster growth and product innovation -- a struggle that still plagues Twitter to this day.

In his series of tweets, Bain praised Twitter's leadership team and the progress that's been made during his tenure:

I came here to help build out the business, but more importantly build a team. My team is the best legacy anyone can leave. We took the company from $0 to Billions faster than almost anyone's ever done it. We diversified the business, took it global. We took an organization and scaled it in every way possible. Most importantly, we did it right--- in the right way --- in a way that makes us proud.

Bain didn't say where he's headed in his post-Twitter career or offer too much insight into his decision to leave. But his departure isn't all that surprising, as Twitter is currently shopping for buyers and trimming its head count.

Early in October, reports emerged that Twitter was in late-stage acquisition talks with CRM giant Salesforce, but the companies ultimately nixed the deal. Shortly after, Twitter announced plans to to cut nine percent of its workforce in a move designed to speed up revenue growth.

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