UK CS graduates more likely to be unemployed

Summary:Zack Whittaker was on compassionate leave when this was posted; posted offline and scheduled to release during this week.People over the years have said to me, "computers are the future; you'll end up getting a great job with wads of money.

Zack Whittaker was on compassionate leave when this was posted; posted offline and scheduled to release during this week.

People over the years have said to me, "computers are the future; you'll end up getting a great job with wads of money." I'm not a money person, to be honest; I think my CV over the last couple of years proves that to some extent. But with new information from The Guardian, it seems computer science graduates are less likely to be employed, than any other subject.

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Now, this could mean anything to anybody; it's just a list of graduate degrees with numbers attached. I'll elaborate and explain, in my crazy student-minded ways.

The table represents the "percentage of UK and EU domiciled first degree qualifiers assumed to be unemployed by subject area, 2002-03 to 2006-07". This roughly translated means, "the percentage of those who live in the United Kingdom and those in European Union countries, who have earned a degree and are presumed to be not in employment, with figures ranging between 2002 and 2007."

"Unemployed" you say? What if you carry on earning another qualification? What if that graduate died? So many questions asked about the validity of the figures, so another explanation is needed.

The figures take into account what the student classed themselves as. Some are just out of university and need a break, some are looking for work, and some are going on to earn a masters or doctorate qualification. It also takes into account part-time study, research with fellow graduates or professors at the university, but also those who were presently unemployed - regardless of the fact they might actually be starting a job in the coming weeks.

So even with all this - why are recently-graduated computer science students so unlikely to get work in relation to other subjects? You know what... I haven't got the foggiest. The results surprised even me. Leave comments, thoughts, opinions and ideas - because for the life of me, I don't know why computer scientists with all their skills could possibly not be needed or wanted.

Topics: Hardware, CXO

About

Zack Whittaker writes for ZDNet, CNET, and CBS News. He is based in New York City.

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