Wikileaks effect on global data security views limited at best

The information security story behind Wikileaks---unsecured data was easily leaked in the battlefield---is well known, but few folks are rethinking their data protection procedures.

The information security story behind Wikileaks---unsecured data was easily leaked in the battlefield---is well known, but few folks are rethinking their data protection procedures.

That's the big takeaway from a global ZDNet poll tracking the Wikileaks aftermath. The Wikileaks incident spurred 40 percent of U.S. readers to at least think about better security procedures. Across the globe, 20 percent or so was the norm. Apparently, only the U.S. military is worried about removable media. Your shop must be just swell.

As noted last week, the U.S. audience is conflicted about Wikileaks. Across the globe, however, Wikileaks support abound by a sizeable majority.

Generally speaking, Wikileaks enjoys wide support everywhere but in the U.S. and Japan. In the U.S., 51 percent said they supported Wikileaks publishing confidential documents. In Japan, that percentage was 59.8 percent. From there the support picked up. In Germany, 88.6 percent of ZDNet readers support Wikileaks' effort. In Australia, 83.9 percent supported publishing confidential documents. China, France and the U.K. all checked in with support above 70 percent.

Meanwhile, 45.5 percent and 42.6 percent of ZDNet users in France and Germany, respectively, supported denial-of-service attacks as a viable form of public protest. Note that question was disallowed in China.

ZDNet's global Wikileaks poll

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