Will Kryptiq patent stand in the way of reform?

Patents may validate a method, but that means other methods must also be available. Patented technology should not be made a standard or you're raising health care costs for everyone.

Kryptiq logoKryptiq, a Portland company that specializes in electronic communication complying with HIPAA, says it has a patent in how it moves that data.

The patent covers a method for encrypting data on a server so that the data hosting it does not actually have direct access to the decrypted data. This protects the data from interception or from capture by a hacker without the decryption key.

On the surface, not a bad thing. And Kryptiq is highly admired for both its systems and customer wins. It is acquiring rivals and moving forward.

The question is what it does with the patent. If the patent acts as a differentiator, a reason for a hospital group to choose Kryptiq instead of something else, that's one thing.

If Kryptiq seeks to make its system a standard, that's something else.

It's vital that health care IT standards be open, that there be no gatekeepers, nothing to prevent free and open competition among vendors.

Patents may validate a method, but that means other methods must also be available. Patented technology should not be made a standard or you're raising health care costs for everyone.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All