Australia tops OECD mobile broadband penetration, fibre lags

Australia tops OECD mobile broadband penetration, fibre lags

Summary: Australia has topped the list of OECD countries when it comes to mobile broadband subscriptions per capita.

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Australians' love of mobile broadband has seen it rise to the top of the list of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries when it comes to the number of mobile broadband subscriptions per capita.

The latest statistics to come from the OECD released overnight showed that as of June 2013, there were 25.94 million mobile broadband subscriptions in Australia, with a 114 percent penetration rate. Australia beat out Finland, Sweden, Japan, Korea, Denmark, and the United States for the top spot.

The US topped the total number of subscribers, at 299.45 million, followed by Japan, at 134.3 million, Korea, at 51.45 million, and the UK, at 50.86 million.

Australia doesn't fare as well when it comes to fixed-line broadband connections per 100 residents, however, tying at 18th in the list of OECD countries with Austria, at 25.6 percent penetration rate. The growth in penetration for fixed broadband was only slightly over 1 percent for the year between June 2012 and June 2013.

Switzerland topped the list for fixed broadband penetration, at with 43.8 connections per 100 residents, followed by the Netherlands, Denmark, Korea, and France.

While the future of Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN) remains unclear, with the Coalition government considering the options put forward in the NBN Co strategic review released last year, the OECD statistics reveal that Australia is currently sitting at 25th in the rankings for the percentage of connections via fibre to the home or fibre to the building.

Just 1.97 percent of Australians connecting to fixed broadband were connecting via fibre as of June last year, but the OECD showed that Australia was recording some of the strongest growth for fibre connections in the OECD, with 121.5 percent growth between June 2012 and June 2013.

Japan topped the list for fibre penetration, with 68.45 percent accessing fixed broadband via fibre, followed by Korea, at 62.76 percent, then Sweden and Estonia.

The United States reported a 7.73 percent penetration rate for fibre, while the UK reported 7.19 percent fibre penetration.

Mexico recorded the highest growth in fibre subscriptions, at 289.7 percent for the year, but reported that just 4.73 percent of its fixed broadband subscriptions were through fibre.

Topics: Telcos, Government, Government AU, Mobility, NBN, Australia

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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6 comments
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  • Little Choice

    It's no wonder we top the list as for many of us Wireless is the only option available & now will likely continue to be the situation as Turnbull continues to mislead us behind a veil of redacted self-serving "Reports" from his selected cronies while ignoring the tech savvy experts & obediently following Abbott's Murdoch inspired directive to "Demolish the NBN.
    grump-a1eeb
  • Asutralians forced into wireless!

    Australians are being forced into very expensive wireless broadband because Telstra's inability and unwillingness to invest in improving their technology.
    The greed of these mobile companies in brain-dead shock jocks and the Murdochracy to promote their hyper expensive and really poor quality solutions.
    Kevin Cobley
  • It's complementary usage, people...

    There are five people, with six mobile phone accounts in our house, all with data plans which come provided as part of their mobile phone contracts.

    Our home has one fixed broadband (ADSL2+) plan, but that's where the majority of downloads are conducted. At home, on laptops/tablets, over the home WiFi network.

    With mobile data costs being what they are, nobody in their right mind would use it for regular heavy downloading. Checking Facebook, looking up the address of a restaurant while out and about, mobile. Downloading off iTunes, streaming TV, gaming, etc., fixed line every time.

    Rather than being a ringing endorsement of mobile wireless broadband take-up over fixed line (as the media appear to want us to believe...agenda anyone?), in my opinion, this report simply shows that more people are ditching dumb phones, and buying smartphones with data plans.

    Mobile wireless is a complementary system to fixed-line broadband. Unless costs come down considerably, I don't believe that it will never replace it.
    Perth SteveH
  • curses, no edit feature...

    Mobile wireless is a complementary system to fixed-line broadband. Unless costs come down considerably, I don't believe that it will ever fully replace it.
    Perth SteveH
  • We now wait the avalanche of anti-NBN stories

    I'm sure the meaning of these data will be used by the anti-NBN pundits in the media as evidence for Australia not needing the NBN in either ALP or LNP forms.
    chronicinfoholic
  • Stunted Growth

    "Just 1.97 percent of Australians connecting to fixed broadband were connecting via fibre as of June last year, but the OECD showed that Australia was recording some of the strongest growth for fibre connections in the OECD, with 121.5 percent growth between June 2012 and June 2013."

    Turnbull will do his best to turn that growth around, in fact, the feedback in the Whirlpool forums is that fibre roll out has almost stalled.
    Goresh