Australia loses ground in Asia-Pacific's datacentre explosion

Australia loses ground in Asia-Pacific's datacentre explosion

Summary: In just a few years, Asia-Pacific's datacentre traffic will be 35 percent higher than North America’s. Australia, it seems, won’t keep pace with growth in the region.

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Are you ready for some big numbers? Cisco's new Global Cloud Index claims that global datacentre traffic will grow almost threefold between 2011 and 2016. By then, traffic will have totalled 6.6 zettabytes (ZB) — which is apparently enough to accommodate 12 hours of daily web conferences for the world's 3.8 billion workers.

20121029_data-centre-traffic

Yet, work use will comprise just a small part of total datacentre traffic. Last year, consumer traffic was four times more than business traffic; by 2016, it will be almost six times more. In each case, cloud applications will account for almost two thirds of datacentre traffic, up from 30 percent in 2011 (Cisco distinguishes cloud traffic as on-demand services deployed with elastic and scalable provisioning and usage-based pricing).

By 2016, Asia Pacific will be leading the field, accounting for 36 percent of global datacentre traffic — reaching 2.4ZB in 2016 (up 324 percent on 2011), compared to 1.8ZB in North America (172 percent up).

These figures highlight the growing importance of the datacentre industry, and the increasing diversification of where cloud content is deployed. It is a huge growth industry for the Asia-Pacific region.

Sadly, Cisco has predicted that Australia's share of datacentre traffic in the Asia-Pacific region will fall from 6.5 percent last year to just 4 percent in 2016. That's hardly surprising, given the growth of economies to our north, but a chance to play a bigger role in meeting this demand would have been nice, if only our electricity wasn't so expensive. Still, with datacentre traffic within the country growing threefold (from 37 exabytes in 2011 to 107 exabytes in 2016), there's still plenty of room for home-grown cloud providers.

Topics: Data Centers, Cloud, Networking

About

Phil Dobbie has a wealth of radio and business experience. He started his career in commercial radio in the UK and, since coming to Australia in 1991, has held senior marketing and management roles with Telstra, OzEmail, the British Tourist Authority and other telecommunications, media, travel and advertising businesses.

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  • Stalled Cloud without decent BB speeds.

    All our local phone lines here in regional NSW can achieve is ADSL 1 with a max upload speed of 0.13Mbps (KB/s: 16.23) with regular drop-outs on files of any size forcing a re-start from scratch.
    grump3