Australia watches as Kiwis go postal on violent game

Australia watches as Kiwis go postal on violent game

Summary: A computer game described by New Zealand's censor as allowing a player to "test how much violence and humiliation" he or she can inflict on others has not been submitted for classification in Australia, the federal government said.A spokesperson for Attorney-General Philip Ruddock told ZDNet Australia   the game -- Postal 2: Share the Pain -- had not been put forward for assessment by the Office of Film and Literature Classification, meaning it "cannot be legally sold or hired in Australia".

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A computer game described by New Zealand's censor as allowing a player to "test how much violence and humiliation" he or she can inflict on others has not been submitted for classification in Australia, the federal government said.

A spokesperson for Attorney-General Philip Ruddock told ZDNet Australia   the game -- Postal 2: Share the Pain -- had not been put forward for assessment by the Office of Film and Literature Classification, meaning it "cannot be legally sold or hired in Australia".

Reports from New Zealand said the country's censor had banned the game, determining its availability to be "injurious to the public good".

The game allows players to control a character called Postal Dude who assaults other characters in a variety of ways, including kicking them, killing them and mutilating their corpses. The classification office also said "visual and vocal references throughout the game reinforce callous racist, sexist and homophobic stereotypes..."

Only a small number of copies of the game were in circulation in New Zealand, none of which were available through commercial outlets in the country.

Both Australia and New Zealand earlier this year banned the game Manhunt, the Australia's Office of Film and Literature Classification revoking the game's MA15+ certificate after an appeal by Ruddock based on a complaint by Western Australian Justice Minister Michelle Roberts.

Topics: Hardware, Emerging Tech

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  • Having worked for several years in the gaming industry as a developer, I guess I can say that 'games' are NOT always for kids! Given that there are extremely violent and pornographic films out there one would think it to be common sense to have similar ratings on games. And then educate the retail outlets that you can't sell an 'R' rated game to a minor in the same way a video store won't hire out a 'X' rated film. I am astounded that the government will not recognise games as an adult medium. If the content were discribed as 'Digital Entertainment' perhaps it would be seen in a different light. As adults living in the democracy we do one would think it fair not to censor what we should be free to experience...as adults! NOT ALL GAMES ARE FOR KIDS! We need a better rating system!
    anonymous