BlackBerry CEO knocks Samsung's enterprise plans, security: Fear or fact?

BlackBerry CEO knocks Samsung's enterprise plans, security: Fear or fact?

Summary: Samsung is going after Apple in the enterprise and when the marketing engine gets fired up BlackBerry is at risk of being forgotten.

SHARE:

BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins knows where his company's bread is buttered---the enterprise---and he's not too keen to Samsung's encroachment amid the bring your own device trend.

In an interview with CNET's Roger Cheng, Heins made the following points as the BlackBerry Z10 launched in the U.S.:

  • Android is susceptible to attacks.
  • BlackBerry 10 was designed to be secure from the ground up. 
  • Samsung's efforts to secure Android with its SAFE (Samsung approved for the enterprise) program and applications like Knox are the equivalent of leaving the front door open, but locking windows.

Now you can take these comments two ways. First, BlackBerry's Heins is giving Samsung some play in the enterprise by calling the company out. In some respects, BlackBerry may be threatened or even worried. On the other hand, Heins is only outlining what many chief information officers already think about Android---it's a pain to secure. Overall, Heins came off as dismissive of Samsung, which he argues will have good enough security but little else. Heins can use recent headlines to make his case. 

Great Debate: Can Samsung out-Apple Apple in BYOD? | The hard road to BlackBerry 10: BlackBerry's CEO on why he ignored advice to go Android

Samsung countered Heins and said SAFE and Knox were just the beginning of enterprise-friendly efforts. Tim Wagner, general manager of enterprise sales for Samsung Mobile, said:

The BYOD trend shows that people want to choose the device they use for work. With a 100 million Galaxy S devices sold, it is clear that Samsung is growing in popularity. We are committed, and investing significantly, to ensure our devices can be used securely for both work and play.

The reality is that both BlackBerry and Samsung have to gun for Apple, which has used the bring your own device movement to grab the most market share in corporations. According to Citrix, Apple leads the market share race in the enterprise. Android is No. 2. In the consumer world, Android rules in market share.

In many respects, Heins' comments make a lot of sense. Samsung is going after Apple in the enterprise and when the marketing engine gets fired up BlackBerry is at risk of being forgotten.

BlackBerry is likely to have an inside position in the corporate world only because it has a large installed base, is tackling mobile device management and is familiar to IT buyers. Samsung has a bit of convincing to do and need customer wins and the case studies that go with them.

However, Samsung does have a window of opportunity. Gartner has argued that the BlackBerry 10 platform has to prove itself with consumers and then the enterprise again with BlackBerry Enterprise Server. In a recent post, Gartner noted:

Gartner recommends that organizations considering BES10 for a mobile device management (MDM) solution to support multiple devices should wait six months until it is clear that BB10 has proven successful in the consumer market. It is important to wait to make any moves toward full support of BB10 devices until the market makes a clear statement on BB10's success (or lack thereof).

More Samsung

More BlackBerry:

Topics: Bring Your Own Device, Mobility, BlackBerry, Samsung, Smartphones

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

19 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • whaaaaat?

    Don't you dare pick on Samsung, they will destroy you!
    cyang00
    • They will destroy you!?.

      LOl!! don't put to much hope and trust with your Samsung. Blackberry was first used in a lots of business enterprise Android was never used in any business enterprise too early to say that.

      Maybe you are just new to PDA's.
      aeon5388
    • BYOB destroys BB

      I have not heard of anyone in the past few years buying their own personal BlackBerry. I know they are out there just like I know unicorns exist (don't try to tell me different) but most corps are moving to BYOB and no one is bringing in their BB to be connected. I work with our own MDM solution and our BES and the only thing on the BES now are international phones because data is so expensive and BB sip data compared to other smart phones.

      Just like IBM is still around (just was in a meeting with them this week) so too can BB hang in there as a niche product for government and high security industries. But they will never again take on Apple or Android (or even Win Phone).
      Rann Xeroxx
      • Not heard of any 1 buying their own personal BB ...

        Really? the past few years..
        My $hit makes more sense than your dribble ..
        Where the hell do you dream this crap up from ??
        Figures IBM .. who the hell deals with them anymore .. oh ya you !!
        CND-Dude
  • BlackBerry is Superior in Enterprise

    CIOs should stop complaining about security of Android and iOS and pick the platform that's built with security in mind. Android as a consumer product has been great but from a security standpoint, it's snow covered dung--it's not designed with security in mind. The security implementations are add-ons as an afterthought or need in the BYOD marketplace.
    doedefender
  • No one can touch Blackberry security

    You can NOT add patch code to a security-flawed OS and compete with BB10 which was built from the ground up with security at the heart. Consider 'Balance' which separates work/personal to the OS level, every email, text, picture, app, COMPLETELY separate. It's not even possible, AT ALL, on Android, but they will come up with some hack code that makes it appear that they have duplicated it.

    The clever names "Safe" and "Knox" don't replace planning and experience. Face it, iOS and Android were both designed to play apps, and they do it VERY well. Adding security as an afterthought, only when it seemed to benefit them to do so, is not who I would want protecting my corporate information.
    Daniel Kinem
  • Why go for second best...

    If you're looking for security why would you go with something that's unproven on an os clearly under attack when BB supports android and iOS. Sorry Samsung but BlackBerry is clearly the gold standard.
    Buzz88
  • A slight omission ...

    "BlackBerry is likely to have an inside position in the corporate world only because it has a large installed base, is tackling mobile device management and is familiar to IT buyers."

    There's also the minor point that they are much more secure...which is the whole point.
    radleym
  • Moot point

    Security is not what has kept Samsung from taking market share from Blackberry. Blackberry has lost its place despite having more security. He might as well tell the world that Blackberry packaging is nicer than Samsung's
    flyguy29
    • Yes

      yes, but now that the User Experience of the new BB phones is equal to or better than the Samsung and iPhones, security will triumph again.
      Why would you let someone use a less secure phone? They cannot complain about no Angry Birds on their work phones.
      Susan Antony
  • Right

    "..BlackBerry is likely to have an inside position in the corporate world only because it has a large installed base, is tackling mobile device management and is familiar to IT buyers..."

    No. BlackBerry has an inside position because it has security, better email, and now Balance.
    And it is now equal or better than the competition in the personal User Experience part of smartphone use with the exception of some apps, which will come with time.
    There is no longer any reason to allow any other type of smartphone into the enterprise.
    Susan Antony
    • Wow!

      Those are some really powerful statements for a company that's barely hanging on by a thread. Blackberry is hoping and praying that their newest mobile platform doesn't fail and put them out of business.

      Blackberry doesn't have an inside position at our company any longer because they failed to stay relevant. The server requirement and additional licensing costs are just silly; all so a user can connect into my Exchange server with an outdated piece of hardware (that came out in 2010 no less). The lack of attractive hardware and OS software that looks like a 70's sci-fi flick have contributed to Blackberry's demise.

      I just don't see how RIM's Hail Mary play is touted by you and others as the second coming when it's neither impressive nor proven.

      In a short year, we'll all look back on these posts and laugh because RIM will have shut its doors and Blackberry smartphones will be on display at the Smithsonian.
      Pmadkins
      • Blackberry is doing fine

        your comments are drivel and not worth commenting on
        deaf_e_kate
        • Doing fine?

          We're doing everything we can to get rid of the Blackberry in our enterprise.

          Also, your username is a play on defecate and you comment about all of the '12-year-olds' in this thread? I think we all know where the drivel is coming from. When you can post something compelling, maybe we can talk. Until then, you may want to get your head out of Blackberry's butt; after all, even scum-suckers like you have to breathe at some point.
          Pmadkins
  • Like Samsung's chances and government agency has already blessed KNOX

    Blackberry has same problem as other Linux platforms unless you restrict what users can download. If it strictly prohibit other downloads (apps), then it can't compete as most users want productive or leisure apps. KNOX allows IT to control business environment as to not impact business networks. Samsung has played in enterprise to know what needs to be done (they have head start than all other Android devices).
    cskusc
    • This is true...

      If you completely ignore balance. Businesses can restrict the work side of the phone and the users can download all of the leisure apps they want on the personal side of the phone.
      CPPCrispy
    • What?

      I hope you are not comparing BB to Samsung? as they are both completely different phone types, and have completely different security models!
      Samsung has it's security built on top of Android (much like an app or extension)
      BB is built from the ground up to be a secure platform.
      There is a huge difference!
      CND-Dude
      • you talk too much sense

        for the 12 year old posters here
        deaf_e_kate
  • you talk too much sense

    for the 12 year old posters here
    deaf_e_kate