Simon Bisson

Born on the Channel Island of Jersey, Simon moved to the UK to attend the University of Bath where he studied electrical and electronic engineering. Since then a varied career has included being part of the team building the world's first solid state 30KW HF radio transmitter, writing electromagnetic modelling software for railguns, and testing the first ADSL equipment in the UK. He also built one the UK's first national ISPs, before spending several years developing architectures for large online services for many major brands. For the last decade he's been a freelance writer, specialising in enterprise technologies and development. He works with his wife and writing partner Mary Branscombe from a small house in south west London, or from anywhere there's a WiFi signal and a place for a laptop.

Mary Branscombe

Mary Branscombe is a freelance tech journalist. Mary has been a technology writer for nearly two decades, covering everything from early versions of Windows and Office to the first smartphones, the arrival of the web and most things inbetween.

Latest Posts

Dillinger: Legacy

Dillinger: Legacy

Tron: Legacy was one of 2010's most anticipated movies, with a year or so's worth of teaser trailers and alternate reality games. We were lucky enough to get to a preview showing a couple of weeks ago, and it's one of those films that leaves you wondering about the technology its designers envisaged.

December 20, 2010 by in Windows

Which passwords do I need to change?

Which passwords do I need to change?

Beyond the irony of Gawker releasing some of its own secrets for a change - or at least the emails and passwords of its users - are some sobering thoughts about how many of us are using weak and easily cracked passwords, or thinking up one strong password and using it everywhere because we can't manage to remember lots of strong passwords as well as where they're all for.

December 14, 2010 by in Windows

Buzzing around the web APIary

Buzzing around the web APIary

There's a problem with single vendor events: it's easy for them to become echo chambers with their own reality distortion fields that quickly leave you feeling you're at a religious revival. Now that may be my innate British journalist cynicism showing, but I certainly found the Cloudstock pre-conference event at this year's Salesforce.

December 9, 2010 by in Windows

Sony VAIO: P is for portable, not perfect

Sony VAIO: P is for portable, not perfect

If you're looking for something that nails the idea of the netbook, Sony has pretty much the full range of approaches in the VAIO series (leaving out budget): basic (the W series), the lightest computer you can think of but with a decent-sized screen and keyboard (the X series) or small enough to slip into a handbag or the back pocket of your jeans (the P series).

December 6, 2010 by in Windows

Redmond gives the cloud a solid foundation

Redmond gives the cloud a solid foundation

I've recently been working with a couple of different cloud tools and services, and I'm starting to come to the conclusion that cloud platforms are now mature enough that small and medium businesses need to seriously consider using cloud services to replace some, or possibly all, of their core infrastructure.

December 2, 2010 by in Windows

What's the point of Windows Home Server?

What's the point of Windows Home Server?

Having a server at home is getting to be common - but you probably don't call it a server. You call it a PogoPlug or a Time Capsule or a NAS box or a network drive (or less likely 'that old PC I fixed up for sharing').

November 27, 2010 by in Windows

Tip: all the different Office 2010 paste shortcuts

Tip: all the different Office 2010 paste shortcuts

Since I started using the touch-screen HP 2740p tablet, I've found myself tapping buttons in the Office ribbon to run commands - but sometimes keyboard shortcuts are just faster. Ctrl-V is literally hardwired into my brain, I think; even though I nearly always choose the Paste Options button and change the way content has just pasted in - but not quite often enough to want to reset the default.

November 24, 2010 by in Windows

More from Mark Hurd: apps matter, apps are hard work and cloud isn't magic

More from Mark Hurd: apps matter, apps are hard work and cloud isn't magic

Along with promising integrated hardware and software solutions and vertical apps from Oracle and downplaying the virtualisation and automation he was pushing at HP, Oracle president Mark Hurd shared his views on the cloud and Oracle itself. Plus he came up with one of the more compelling arguments about the consumerisation of IT and why enterprises (whether they pin their hopes on Oracle or note) can't keep running the same old internal apps if they're not flexible enough.

November 19, 2010 by in Windows

Intersections In Real Life

Intersections In Real Life

We’re part of many, many networks, all defined by interactions, between people and between things. There’s the obvious wide social network that Facebook’s social graph tries to map (though Marc Smith of the Social Media Research Foundation is currently working with the Node XL graphing tool to find better and more informative ways of drawing social graphs than just pointing at a person and saying “friend”).

November 13, 2010 by in Windows

Why does Azure need a VM role now Hyper-V cloud is here?

Why does Azure need a VM role now Hyper-V cloud is here?

Cloud and virtualisation are related ideas, but they're not the same thing. To Microsoft the real benefit of its Azure cloud service is more than elasticity and scaling and economies of scale; it's that you can have Windows servers without having to do the work of running Windows Server yourself.

November 9, 2010 by in Windows

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