Simon Bisson

Born on the Channel Island of Jersey, Simon moved to the UK to attend the University of Bath where he studied electrical and electronic engineering. Since then a varied career has included being part of the team building the world's first solid state 30KW HF radio transmitter, writing electromagnetic modelling software for railguns, and testing the first ADSL equipment in the UK. He also built one the UK's first national ISPs, before spending several years developing architectures for large online services for many major brands. For the last decade he's been a freelance writer, specialising in enterprise technologies and development. He works with his wife and writing partner Mary Branscombe from a small house in south west London, or from anywhere there's a WiFi signal and a place for a laptop.

Mary Branscombe

Mary Branscombe is a freelance tech journalist. Mary has been a technology writer for nearly two decades, covering everything from early versions of Windows and Office to the first smartphones, the arrival of the web and most things inbetween.

Latest Posts

Not being evil is good business sense

Not being evil is good business sense

Privacy concerns, censorship in China, undermining the business model of every partner they work with from Apple to mapping companies; Google often acts as a financially aware business without seeming to pay too much attention to its motto. Responding to a hacking attempt that they probably suspect is at least the very least condoned by the Chinese government by taking a stand – that’s doing both.

published January 13, 2010 by

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CES: It's a consumer business world

CES: It's a consumer business world

While the C in CES stands for Consumer, the show itself underlines many trends that will affect business computing in 2010. We’ve already written about the return to slate computing, but there’s a lot more at this year’s event for the IT pro to consider…The most obvious is USB 3.

published January 10, 2010 by

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Slate Engine Time (Again)

Slate Engine Time (Again)

If you were here in Las Vegas for CES, you’d think that the slate format tablet PC was here to save the consumer electronics industry.Everyone has one – Steve Ballmer showed off HP’s Windows 7 offering in his opening keynote, while Dell unveiled a prototype 5” smartbook slate running a variant of Android.

published January 8, 2010 by

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Raining on the cloud

Raining on the cloud

The cloud will go down in 2010; that's another of Mark Anderson's predictions for this year. In his words, "There will be a Cloud catastrophe in 2010 that limits Cloud growth by raising security issues and restricting enterprise trust.

published January 1, 2010 by

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Publishing calendars from Outlook to get more confusing

Publishing calendars from Outlook to get more confusing

Every time I sign in to Outlook, I get a credential dialog asking for my password – not for Outlook but for publishing my calendar online. After typing in my Windows Live ID details six times in a row and seeing the dialog reappear I settled for just clicking cancel; after doing that a few dozen times (I don’t restart Outlook very often), I thought I’d see if I could work out why.

published December 18, 2009 by

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Context is Everything

Context is Everything

We’re all used to applications that are at best frustrating, and at worst infuriating. They just don’t seem to do what we want, when we want it.

published December 8, 2009 by

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Will we need snowboots for New York?

Will we need snowboots for New York?

Will Bing or Google make it easier to find out? We’re off to New York for some meetings and the annual Strategic News Service predictions event and I’m wondering what to pack: raincoat or down jacket?

published December 7, 2009 by

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Microsoft at The Mall

Microsoft at The Mall

Not surprisingly, the Microsoft Stores run on Windows. Over the last few months Apple has been switching from using Windows CE handhelds to modified iPod Touches for its EasyPay system in the Apple Store, where you don't have to walk up to a till to buy something.

published December 3, 2009 by

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Less than an OS, less than free

Less than an OS, less than free

What's an OS for? Thanks to Rupert Murdoch, Google has spent most of the time it probably wanted to be talking about Chrome discussing the value of paid content on the Web; but that's actually an awful lot of what Chrome is really for.

published November 24, 2009 by

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