Another SSD jumps on the scene

Another SSD jumps on the scene

Summary: U.S.-based DRAM manufacturer Super Talent Technology has announced a range of Solid State Disks (SSDs) that utilize the industry standard Serial ATA (SATA) interface. Clearly there's a movement afoot toward SSDs for notebook/tablet/portable applications and the parade of new flash-based media offerings is sure to keep the ultra-light, diskless MacBook rumors burning brightly for the foreseeable future.

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TOPICS: Storage
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Super Talent SSDsU.S.-based DRAM manufacturer Super Talent Technology has announced a range of Solid State Disks (SSDs) that utilize the industry standard Serial ATA (SATA) interface. According to DigiTimes the SATA SSDs are available in 1.8-inch, 2.5-inch, and 3.5-inch form factors and are 100% compatible with conventional hard disk drives.

Since they contain no moving parts, SSD drives have the advantage of being far more rugged and reliable than regular hard drives while using 85% less power, claimed the company. Moreover, because SSD drives are built using flash technology, they offer sequential transfer speed comparable to magnetic drives and dramatically faster access speeds.

Super Talent's 1.8-inch SSDs will come in up to 32GB capacities; 2.5-inch in up to 64GB; and 3.5-inch in up to 128GB. As memory continues to get denser its only a matter of time before larger capacities come along with the potential to displace spinning magnetic discs in notebooks.

In January I wrote about the SanDisk 32GB Ultra ATA 1.8-inch SSD, then on Monday Intel announced a line of SSDs that feature a USB interface.

Clearly there's a movement afoot toward SSDs for notebook/tablet/portable applications and the parade of new flash-based media offerings is sure to keep the ultra-light, diskless MacBook (nee NanoBook) rumors burning brightly for the foreseeable future.

Are SSDs the future of portable storage, or will magnetic discs continue their reign? 

Topic: Storage

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  • Because they extend battery life AND make you laptop more rugged at the

    same time, if we can get the cost difference down to about $200 for a 35 Gig flash vs a 40 Gig HD, this will take off.

    I can now go almost 2 hours un-plugged. How much would that increase with a SSD?
    DonnieBoy
  • Flash won't catch hard drives any time soon

    Hard drives continue to increase in areal density and prices continue to decline. So, even though there continues to be speculation that flash will overtake hard drives (esp in mobile devices), all that we'll see continue to happen is a migration of the cross-over point...the capacity point where flash makes more sense. Since we continue to find ways to use more storage capacity, there will continue to be demand for increased capacity drives. Today $500 camcorders are commonly outfitted with 30GB hard drives. Hard drive makers have stated that 1.8-inc drives have costs of around $1 per gigabyte. Similar-capacity flash drives are more in the neighborhood of $300-$600. So we'd have to see flash drives be able to reach much lower prices than they do today to even come close to being a threat to hard drives. And as they do come down, continued improvements in magnetic storage technology will assist in allowing hard drive makers to increase capacities in further in the 1.8-inch form factor, while keeping pricing flat (or similar).

    Regarding power impact, most mobile devices that incorporate flay panel displays are seeing the hards disk storage device using a small percentage of the power budget. In notebook PCs, it's less than 10% of the budget, and capacities in $500 notebooks currently average between 80-120GB...well out of the range of flash, to hit the capacity, or the require cost point for the integrated storage element. There's continued opportunity for flash in the smaller handheld devices, such as PDAs, smart phones, etc. In these devices size is more critical, and required storage capacities are lower...more ideal for flash. I believe the crossover point (in capacity) will continue to migrate upward, allowing both technologies to have legs for a long time to come.
    jb-colorado
  • RE: Another SSD jumps on the scene

    I've sold SuperTalent products before, they're reliable and of relatively good quality from my experience. I presently own a couple sticks of ddr2 by them. I would buy one of their product with confidence.

    Recently tho, I bought a SSD drive by FileMate, oddly enough its called goSOLID. Yeah, its fast enough to give ya wood. I boot XP 64bit in about 1/2 the time from my seagate baracuda's times which were impressive already.

    I got it at NewEgg, 64gb for about $120. The mfg are probably using a MLC based system, or SLC if I'm lucky.. The speed of the drive is up [name pun] there tho, and it works about like you'd expect. I'm tempted to partition it up and dedicate a drive to swap for windows. I doubt this would improve performance tho, and would just junk up my [already too long] list of drives. It would be interesting to see some testing along these lines, but who has 2 whole systems which are alike to test such things on.
    WareWolf801