Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

Summary: As it did last year, the annual Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas will feature a full class on hacking Mac OS X, Mach and Objective-C apps and tools, as well as native Cocoa applications.

SHARE:

As it did last year, the annual Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas will feature a full class on hacking Mac OS X, Mach and Objective-C apps and tools, as well as native Cocoa applications.

The two-day Macsploitation training class will be taught by Italian student and security consultant Vincenzo Iozzo  and professional security analyst Dino Dai Zovi, the author of The Mac Hacker's Handbook.

The second day of the course covers exploitation of security vulnerabilities, covering debugging, exploitation vectors, and payloads. Students will use gdb, IDA Pro, and BinNavi to dynamically examine rich applications and debug exploitation of stack and heap memory corruption vulnerabilities. After students have learned hands-on how to exploit these vulnerabilities, the course will cover OS X payloads and payload techniques. The exploitation labs will be complementary so that students develop their own payloads for their exploit of a vulnerability in a demonstration web browser plugin.

Nice. No, I kid! These guys are helping to keep the Mac safe (we all hope and pray). And the cost isn't cheap, preregistration is $2,000.

Besides bringing a Mac to the conference, attendees will need Vmware Fusion (or equivalent) loaded with a copy of Windows XP loaded, a copy of the IDA Pro disassembler, and Apple's Xcode tools package (it's an additional install on every Mac). The instructors also suggest a copy of zynamics' BinNavi reverse engineering tool with GdbAgent, but that isn't mandatory.

The community can look forward to more Mac security watchers.

At the same time, the state of Mac security continues to much better than that of Windows. It's something that most switchers to the Mac remark upon.

The last update of Mac OS X Snow Leopard (v10.6.6) in January had only one security fix, a vulnerability with Software Update. On the other hand, Microsoft's February Patch Tuesday fixed some 22 vulnerabilities and Microsoft expects to release 3 security bulletins in March to cover 4 serious holes in its OSes.

Topics: Security, Apple, Hardware, Operating Systems, Software

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

40 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • hi, do you know how many microsoft products.services there?

    even mac users install ms offices, and security patches, of course.
    FADS_z
  • Steve Jobs will be calling his lawyers shortly

    There's got to be something about these classes that Steve Jobs can litigate away
    John Zern
    • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

      @John Zern Lol! I know, right?

      Still, I like to think that these classes actually benefit OS X platform security, ultimately.
      lelandhendrix@...
    • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

      @John Zern

      Lawyers can't stop them (as in the hackers that will do the real damage).
      phatkat
  • Last Wed, Apple patched 50 vulnerability just in ITunes and Safari

    Really weak David, your post can be torn to shreds in several ways, I'll stop here:

    "Computerworld noted that Apple typically patches WebKit security issues in Safari first, lending more credence to the belief that Apple may patch Safari very soon, before the contest. Only Apple and Google released patches before Pwn2Own last year.

    That patch didn't stop Miller from winning his third Pwn2Own against Safari last year, and he doesn't expect any patch to stop him this year either. Any patch, if it comes, "won't be a problem," Miller told Ars."

    http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2011/03/likely-pre-pwn2own-safari-patch-unlikely-stop-three-time-pwner.ars
    sagec
    • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

      @jacec

      Talk about weak

      "At the same time, the state of Mac security continues to much better than that of Windows. It?s something that most switchers to the Mac remark upon."

      Any other completely unsubstantiated claims you'd like to make? You are seriously saying that this cutdown Unix is more secure than Win 7? I think it may be time to get some real qualifications.
      tonymcs@...
      • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

        @tonymcs

        Who are you replying to exactly?
        sagec
      • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

        @tonymcs@...

        <i>cutdown Unix</i>

        By cutdown, you are spuriously implying some sort of reduction?

        That is pure garbage - and an attempt at misinformation.

        <i>is more secure than Win 7</i>

        You also talk as if somehow it cannot be more secure than Win 7 - and Win 7 is beyond questioning!!!!

        Manipulation of facts will not affect reality!
        richardw66
      • MacOS X is not a &quot;cutdown&quot;, it is fully certified Unix

        @tonymcs@...
        DDERSSS
  • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

    I thought Macs didn't get viruses?
    The one and only, Cylon Centurion
    • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

      @Cylon Centurion 0005

      Any "jail break" is an OS hack. In effect, that "jail break code" packet is a virus. (Usually, in this context, a "good" virus.)

      The only thing, as an OSX user, that concerns me is this scenario. Clicking on a web site and having my computer network compromised. (Just by clicking on the web site; not by actually downloading or installing any code that particular malicious web site requests I do.)

      Anytime a computer system can become compromised without an owner's expressed permission is a real concern. Fortunately, I have not encountered that type of security breach using OSX during the past seven years.

      Please .. before one posts the rebuttal, "How would you know your system has been compromise?", let me answer, "Of course, I wouldn't know just by looking at it.".

      But I have checked my system, from time to time (rarely, once in a blue moon) and my system has checked free of malicious software.

      Let's just say my trust level with OSX security is rather high.
      kenosha77a
      • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

        @kenosha7777

        As a Windows users for years running around 20 computers at work with MS SBS, virtual network and web servers, I haven't had a virus or any malware for a long, long time. Forefront detects and prevents lame attempts to attache viruses to emails and MSE handles the rest.

        Nor have I encountered any click on a web site problems. I did have a friend in with a root kit the other day, but he was on XP and cheerfully downloaded an executable and ran it - unfortunately, the real problem on any OS is the user who will ignore browser and OS warnings and corrupt their own machine ;-)
        tonymcs@...
      • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

        @kenosha7777 "Fortunately, I have not encountered that type of security breach using OSX during the past seven years. "

        exactly the language a hacker loves to read. Thanks for playing.
        pc_techs_ct@...
      • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

        @kenosha7777
        I totally agree... Getting a virus just by clicking on a link is the worst kind of security compromise. This happens routinely in Windows and not in OS X...
        prof123
    • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

      @Cylon Centurion 0005

      No - Macs do not get viruses in the same way that PCs get viruses.

      In other words - Most PCs I know of have had or do have viruses.

      I have only seen about 3 virus infections in Macs since 1984 - and I have a lot of experience of Macs across many sites.

      So - Macs do not get viruses like PCs

      Do you comprehend now?
      richardw66
      • Why not?

        @richardw66: [i]No - Macs do not get viruses in the same way that PCs get viruses.[/i]

        OS X and Windows use essentially the same security model. I see no technical reason why OS X could not become infected with a virus.
        ye
      • grow a brain ye...

        @ye<br><br>You know that windows and OS X are nothing alike... You know OS X is a fully certified flavor of UNIX and that it does not do active listening and it doesn't allow installed apps to ignore security... The exact opposite of windows...<br><br>Perhaps you were just playing stupid to try to bait richardw66... It was a lame attempt troll boi.<br><br>In the history of virii, there have only been a few for Mac and those were all prior to Mac going UNIX (Pre OS X).<br><br>There has been malware for OS X, but it's more like lameware... It still required six screens and an admin password to install. There has never been a real trojan either. A real trojan is a virus hidden within a real program.<br><br>Windows is still based on the same flawed security model that windows has had since windows 3.1. Networking was an afterthought and security has always been an afterthought of networking. Windows is unsecure by design and UNIX is the exact opposite. It was an OS designed for networking with security as a forethought. Security has always been a forethought which is why permission are so vital in the UNIX world.<br><br>So go crawl back under your rock of denial, suck your thumb, rock back and forth, and tell yourself that windows is secure.... Cus you are the only one dumb enough to buy it.
        i8thecat
      • Active listening? Ignore security?

        @i8thecat: [i]You know OS X is a fully certified flavor of UNIX and that it does not do active listening and it doesn't allow installed apps to ignore security..[/i]

        What the hell is "active listening"? Do you mean services aren't enabled and listening by default? That I agree with. But Windows effectively addressed that with the enabling of the built in firewall with the release of SP2...way back in the summer of 2004.

        How do Windows applications "ignore security"?

        [i]Windows is still based on the same flawed security model that windows has had since windows 3.1.[/i]

        Completely and 100% WRONG. This very statement shows you have no clue about today's versions of Windows and are completely unqualified to discuss it.

        If you're going to make an argument at least understand what it is you're arguing. Otherwise you look like a fool.
        ye
      • &quot;way back in the summer of 2004.&quot;

        Wow. Microsoft was founded in 1975. They entered the OS market in 1980. They finally got around to implementing OS security in 2004. Ssssssssssssssmokin'.
        jasonp@...
      • RE: Black Hat to offer Mac OS X hacking classes

        @richardw66 "I have only seen about 3 virus infections in Macs since 1984 - and I have a lot of experience of Macs across many sites."

        Exactly why Mac users are clueless about security. Thanks for playing. LMAO
        pc_techs_ct@...