Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro runs 40 degrees (F) cooler

Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro runs 40 degrees (F) cooler

Summary: I received my brand new MacBook Pro 2.33GHz Core 2 Duo yesterday and was pleasantly surprised to learn that it runs much cooler than my previous MacBook Pro.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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I received my brand new MacBook Pro 2.33GHz Core 2 Duo yesterday and was pleasantly surprised to learn that it runs much cooler than my previous MacBook Pro.

My Core Duo MacBook Pro 2.0GHz (2GB RAM and 160GB hard drive) would frequently reach temperatures of 162° Fahrenheit after running for more than an hour. It would become so hot that it required me to run Fan Control 1.1 if I needed to use my machine anywhere near my lap.

I've been using a new Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro 2.33GHz for over four hours straight (10+ hours on and off) and the temperature hasn't gone higher than 122° Fahrenheit (average is around 115° F) according to CoreDuoTemp - a drop of more than 40° Fahrenheit without using software like Fan Control.

The fans in the C2D MBP come on a little more often and I can hear them changing speed more frequently than they did on my CD MBP, so I'm guessing that Apple made a major adjustment to the System Management Controller (SMC) firmware. The SMC is a micro-controller on the logic board that controls the power functions for the computer. The SMC controls various functions, including:

  • Power and thermal management, the Sleep LED, and battery.
  • Controlling the fans, supporting Sudden Motion Sensor, ALS, and the power switch.

If you're using a new C2D MacBook Pro, post your CoreDuoTemps in the TalkBack below.

UPDATE: I corrected the headline that previously said that the C2D MBP runs 25 percent cooler. Fahrenheit is not an absolute scale, so percents are meaningless.

UPDATE 2: I left the new MBP running overnight and it maxed out at around 117° Fahrenheit 

Topic: Hardware

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Talkback

14 comments
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  • Fans changing speed often? What drive did you get?

    What drive did you get with it? I've been curious as to the
    performance of the 200GB 4200rpm compared to a 160GB at
    5400.

    Also, are the fans changing speed a lot? My wife's MacBook
    sounds like its mooing at times from fans cycling on and off and
    that drives me batty. I keep the fans at a constant speed with
    SMC fan control on my MacBook Pro and the white noise blends
    into the background.
    shadar1101
    • I got the 160GB (5400RPM) hard drive

      My C2D MBP actually came with the stock 120GB drive, but I swapped in my 160GB drive from my previous MBP.

      The fans are not changing speed "a lot" but I can hear them changing speed more frequently than they did on my CD MBP.

      - Jason
      Jason D. O'Grady
  • Just terrible

    The biggest reason for Apple to go with InHell chips is they use less power (and thus run cooler) in laptops (this was predicated with the unsuccessful attempts to produce a G5 laptop). So why should I buy a Macbook? That speeding up and slowing down of fans is sure to make them fail sooner - and when that happens, will the CPU and/or my thighs burn up?
    Roger Ramjet
    • MBP fan behaviour

      Roger -

      I don't agree that "speeding up and slowing down of fans is sure to make them fail sooner."

      What makes you think this? The fans are designed to run often and their changing RPM is actually a *good* thing if it keeps the machine cooler.

      Besides, if a fan fails, I'm sure that Apple will replace it.

      - Jason
      Jason D. O'Grady
      • No kitchen, just heat

        Will the CPU burn up without a fan? I remember my old Athlon 1400 COOKING itself and the motherboard - when the CPU fan failed. Tom's Hardware did a good investigation into this and showed how Athlon's burned up while InHell chips could take the heat.

        Didn't the old powerbooks come with NO fans? I would suspect that this is the target - a fanless laptop. Fans use energy so you need to factor that in to your "great" CPU wattage use. Maybe this is the defining line between laptops and tablets? Lets hope not.
        Roger Ramjet
    • It's a good thing

      Changing speeds on any rotational mass is a good thing, just like changing images on an old CRT is a good thing. Changing rotational speed increases bearing life, increasing fan life.
      Dr. John
  • Just goes to show you...

    ...wait for the second generation product before buying.
    tic swayback
  • Probably a solid machine - this is Rev 2

    The Core 2 MBP is the second generation of MBP, and it seems
    other than the usual tweaks associated with faster processors
    and MB that its the same basic machine. Factories know how to
    build it. Design guys have fixed their goofs. They undoubtably
    know how much thermal grease to put on now. They've have
    plenty of time to work on the heat problem. So I'd expect the
    reliability to be far better than first MBP's.

    Not that there won't be a few glitches. Continuous improvement
    is built into the DNA of all Asian manufacturing processes. It
    takes a few months to go up the learning curve with new
    products, although some transitions are obviously easier than
    others. Like I expect this one to be.

    If best reliability is what you want, then buy the last machines
    built of a given model just before a new model is introduced.
    Most enthusiasts hate doing that as you are getting 'old'
    technology, but you trade 'bleeding edge' coolness against
    reliability.

    A few companies (IBM Thinkpads of old most notably -- verdict
    is still out on Lenovo) get it right on day one. Apple doesn't rank
    very high on that list as they don't control their manufacturing
    and subsuppliers as well. But Apple's manufacturing partners do
    get it right soon enough.

    I've had two bad Powerbooks out of a dozen purchased, and
    both of those were the original 15" Aluminum G4's... bleeding
    edge purchases as soon as the store opened after
    announcement. All others were bought in mid to last half of
    production runs and have been great.
    shadar1101
  • Any performance testing between the Core Duo and Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro

    Are you going to do some performance testing with the older MacBook Pro Core Duo and newer MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo? It would be nice to know how does 32-bit and 64-bit compare.
    phatkat
  • Have they fixed the sleep problem?

    When you closed a Powerbook, it went to sleep almost instantly.
    The MBP, on the otherhand, takes 15+ seconds. I've also had it
    just not shut off at all a few times. Is this still a problem with the
    MBPv2?
    cws_zdnet@...
    • Safe Sleep

      I think you'll find that this is because with the newer Powerbooks, iBooks, and MB(P)s Apple introduced "Safe Sleep", causing the computer to dump the contents of RAM to the hard disk before sleep. Try pulling the battery out of a MBP when it's asleep and pulling the connector out, and then putting it all back together and pressing the Power button. Of course, if this isn't useful for you, then you can turn it off with

      $ sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0

      in the Terminal
      cmjrees
  • RE: Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro runs 25???0cooler

    Watch this!
    http://www.pcsilenzioso.it/forum/showthread.php?t=6281
    -NEMO-
  • RE: Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro runs 25?0cooler

    Watch this!
    http://www.pcsilenzioso.it/forum/showthread.php?t=6281
    -NEMO-
  • RE: Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro runs 25???0cooler

    Watch this!
    http://www.pcsilenzioso.it/forum/showthread.php?t=6281
    -NEMO-