Getting started with AppleScript

Getting started with AppleScript

Summary: Most Mac users, especially those coming from the Windows camp, don't realize that Mac OS X comes with AppleScript, a free, easy-to-use, "natural language," scripting language. To boost the understanding of this language and its tools for beginners and pros, Peachpit Press this week announced the release of AppleScript 1-2-3, a new book that offers step-by-step guidance for making scripts and using them to improve your productivity.

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Most Mac users, especially those coming from the  Windows camp, don't realize that Mac OS X comes with AppleScript, a free, easy-to-use, "natural language," scripting language. These scripts can tie together actions from Mac applications, Unix commands, the Finder and other code.

To boost the understanding of this language and its tools for beginners and pros, Peachpit Press this week announced the release of AppleScript 1-2-3, a new book that offers step-by-step guidance for making scripts and using them to improve your productivity.

AppleScript 1-2-3 is by Sal Soghoian, Apple's product Manager for automation technologies, and Bill Cheeseman, a longtime scripting guru, when he's not being a lawyer. The articles are based on their seminars presented over the years at Macworld Expo.

The book will be on shelves and Amazon this month, and no doubt at the publisher's booth at Macworld Expo.

You can check out the first chapter online at Apple's scripting site.

Topics: Software Development, Apple, Hardware

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4 comments
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  • AppleScript is a major security hole

    [url=http://macscan.securemac.com/security-advisory-applescripttht-trojan-horse/] Security Risk: Critical [/url]
    NonZealot
    • Distortion Is Beneath You

      The advisory, from June, is about a trojan which requires download and opening and is a compiled AppleScript file. Compiled being, to my mind, the key word. I don't think the security hole is with AppleScript, per se, but that users may be fooled into making wrong choices.

      As with all the platforms: know the web sites you visit, don't download any thing on the site's say so, do not go to the web with an Administrative account, and disable opening of "safe" files. Sandboxes, if you got 'em.

      As the only "news" item here is that a publisher will have a book available soon, I'll mention that O'Reilly has had an AppleScript book for ages. People interested in programmic and external interaction with application on their Mac should look into F-Script as well.
      DannyO_0x98
  • Tell application "Finder", select "Trash", JUMP IN. (nt)

    nt
    V@...
  • NonZealt is a major security hole...

    NonZealt is a major security hole because he can run a Trojan Horse application made from any programming language that does all the things he listed in the link on absolutely any computer.

    There is nothing more or less secure about an AppleScript application than any other application masquerading as something it isn't.
    olePigeon