Ed Bott

Ed Bott is an award-winning technology writer with more than two decades' experience writing for mainstream media outlets and online publications. He has served as editor of the U.S. edition of PC Computing and managing editor of PC World; both publications had monthly paid circulation in excess of 1 million during his tenure. He is the author of more than 25 books on Microsoft Windows and Office, including Windows 7 Inside Out (2009) and Office 2013 Inside Out (2013).

Latest Posts

How will the new Office for iPad work?

How will the new Office for iPad work?

You don't need a crystal ball to figure out how Microsoft plans to make Office work on iPad. Hint: It involves subscriptions. And the analysts who are following Office need to rework their spreadsheets and change their assumptions.

published March 1, 2013 by

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SkyDrive and Office Web Apps versus Google

SkyDrive and Office Web Apps versus Google

It's hard to think of Microsoft Office as anything other than the archetypal Windows desktop program. But while no one was looking, Microsoft's free online apps and storage turned surprisingly powerful. Are the free apps good enough to use in place of Office?

published February 28, 2013 by

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Hands-on with the new Office 365 business plans

Hands-on with the new Office 365 business plans

With the public launch of its new Office 365 business plans, Microsoft's move into a subscription-based Office is nearly complete. How much technical skill does it take to set up and run one of these plans? Here's a hands-on look.

published February 27, 2013 by

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Microsoft's attempts to clarify Office licensing policies fall short

Microsoft's attempts to clarify Office licensing policies fall short

Microsoft's new "no transfer" policy for Office 2013 has left some customers asking what happens if the original PC fails and needs replacement. A corporate blog post tries to "add clarity" to the issue, but what the company really needs to do is change the license terms themselves. UPDATED: Microsoft reverses policy, will allow transfers after all.

published February 22, 2013 by

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How Apple used its money and muscle to kill an iTunes competitor

How Apple used its money and muscle to kill an iTunes competitor

Remember Lala, the innovative music service that made a splash in 2009? After Apple bought the company, Lala's services vanished. Now, a candid (maybe too candid) report from an insider explains why Apple was willing to pay $160 million to make this "clear and present danger" to iTunes go away.

published January 19, 2013 by

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