Ed Bott

Ed Bott is an award-winning technology writer with more than two decades' experience writing for mainstream media outlets and online publications. He has served as editor of the U.S. edition of PC Computing and managing editor of PC World; both publications had monthly paid circulation in excess of 1 million during his tenure. He is the author of more than 25 books on Microsoft Windows and Office, including Windows 7 Inside Out (2009) and Office 2013 Inside Out (2013).

Latest Posts

Windows without viruses and spyware? Yes, it's possible

Windows without viruses and spyware? Yes, it's possible

How do you protect Dad, Grandma, or Little Ricky from viruses and malware? The convention wisdom is to install multiple layers of antivirus and antispyware software and then come back once a month to clean up the mess. That's wrong. Here's my eight-step program for creating a practically bulletproof Windows XP machine.

published August 24, 2006 by

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IE7 marches toward completion

IE7 marches toward completion

The most interesting part of today's announcement that an IE7 release candidate is now available is the almost complete lack of news. If you're using a previous beta version, the upgrade is a must; for everyone else, it's a yawn.

published August 24, 2006 by

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A closer look at Windows Update problems

A closer look at Windows Update problems

Two weeks ago, I reported on widespread problems with Microsoft's Automatic Updates and Windows Update services. Microsoft confirmed those problems a few days later, assuring Windows users that the delays in downloading updates were "perfectly normal." I've put together a new image gallery that illustrates substantial problems with Microsoft's update process. But they're not willing to talk about it.

published August 23, 2006 by

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How much is Windows worth?

How much is Windows worth?

If you walk into a retail store, you'll find shrink-wrapped copies of Windows on the shelves for as much as $299. But these days, you can a whole PC for that amount of money. As a result, consumers have a distorted view of what Windows should cost. Do Microsoft's artificially high retail prices encourage piracy and discourage legal upgrades?

published August 21, 2006 by

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Whose new tools are more open?

Whose new tools are more open?

Microsoft has a browser toolbar. So does Google. Microsoft has a blog-authoring tool. So does Google. One is surprisingly open, the other is mostly closed. Guess which is which?

published August 16, 2006 by

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Microsoft confirms slow updates

Microsoft confirms slow updates

Didn't get your August updates yet? Microsoft says this is "perfectly normal." They also acknolwedge that they've prioritized delivery of the highly-publicized MS06-040 patch. But they aren't providing any more details about the slowdown.

published August 15, 2006 by

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Windows Update: The slowdown continues

Windows Update: The slowdown continues

I first reported on apparently widespread problems with Microsoft's Windows Update and Automatic Update services on Saturday. Since then, I've heard numerous confirmations of problems from others. I've sent e-mail to Microsoft requesting comment. Meanwhile, here's the result of some more testing I've done in the past 24 hours.

published August 14, 2006 by

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Are Microsoft's update servers broken?

Are Microsoft's update servers broken?

Millions of people rely on Microsoft's Automatic Updates and Windows Update to deliver critical security patches. But four days after this month's Patch Tuesday, those updates are not being delivered for many Windows users. Windows Update log files point to "heavy download traffic" as the culprit. Are Microsoft's servers collapsing under the load?

published August 12, 2006 by

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Busted! What happens when WGA attacks

Busted! What happens when WGA attacks

When Microsoft's Windows Genuine Advantage software kicks in and identifies your copy of Windows as "non-genuine," what happens next? On the surface, at least, Microsoft is all tea and sympathy: "You may be a victim of software counterfeiting," says the official message that takes over the Windows startup screen. But that's a funny way to treat a victim, because everything in the WGA experience is intended to get you to open your wallet and pay for a new product key and Windows CD, even if you already own a perfectly legal license. I've got all the details here.

published August 9, 2006 by

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Confused over WGA? You're not alone

Confused over WGA? You're not alone

Arrrggghhh! Microsoft has finally tagged my phony copy of Windows XP. I'm officially a pirate now and can finish my in-depth report on WGA. Meanwhile, here are some comments on my latest post, many of them betraying a misunderstanding of Windows licensing, Windows Product Activation, and WGA. I've responded to some of the most interesting comments here.

published August 9, 2006 by

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Another WGA failure

Another WGA failure

I just experienced a Windows Genuine Advantage failure. Only it’s not a false positive, like the horror stories I’ve been hearing for nearly two months now. No, I just installed a pirated copy of Windows using a stolen product key, and Microsoft's Windows Genuine Advantage tool says I'm perfectly legal. The whole story reveals a lot about how poorly the WGA program is being run.

published August 8, 2006 by

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IE7 or Firefox 2: Which browser is more secure?

IE7 or Firefox 2: Which browser is more secure?

Microsoft and Mozilla are on a collision course, racing to complete major updates to their flagship web browsers scheduled for release this fall. IE7 and Firefox 2 include major new security features, including tools to help stop phishing attacks. Does either browser have an edge?

published August 2, 2006 by

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Who's waiting for Windows Vista?

Who's waiting for Windows Vista?

Not business, that's for sure, according to a new report. Meanwhile, Microsoft is rushing to have shrink-wrapped copies of its new operating system available for consumers in ... January? If there's a worse month for a product launch, it's hard to imagine what it could be.

published August 1, 2006 by

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Linux, XP, and my old PC

Linux, XP, and my old PC

My loyal commenters keep telling me I should give up on Windows and switch to Linux. I'm trying, I'm trying! For my latest attempt, I added some inexpensive hardware upgrades to a Y2K-era notebook, blew away Windows Me, and set it up to dual-boot Windows XP and Ubuntu Linux. Guess which one I'm using now?

published July 31, 2006 by

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A "modest" price increase for Vista?

A "modest" price increase for Vista?

Microsoft's Vista boss tells a room full of financial analysts that the high-end version of Microsoft's new operating system will cost a little more, and he won't commit to a ship date. So why is this good news for Windows customers?

published July 27, 2006 by

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