Adobe: Apple's anti-Flash moves won't impact Creative Suite; HTML 5 not ready yet

Adobe: Apple's anti-Flash moves won't impact Creative Suite; HTML 5 not ready yet

Summary: Adobe execs said that Apple's move to cut off Flash development for the iPhone and iPad won't impact the company's Creative Suite sales. And HTML 5 isn't ready for prime time.

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Adobe's Mark Garrett, chief financial officer at the company, said Monday that Apple's move to cut off Flash development for the iPhone and iPad won't impact the company materially.

Much of Garrett's talk at the JMP Securities conference revolved around sales of the Creative Suite 5 (CS5). After all, CS 5 is where the money will be. However, there were a few questions about how the Apple Flash flap, will affect Adobe, which has bet on every mobile platform not named iPhone---Android and BlackBerry primarily.

The comments were the latest in a rhetoric war between Apple and Adobe.

According to a transcript of the talk, Garrett, along with investor relations vice president Mike Saviage, addressed the Apple Flash issue in a few areas.

Garrett was asked about whether Apple's Flash move would impact CS 5. After all, Adobe did mention Apple's anti-Flash message as a risk to business. He said:

The question is around the 6 million creative professionals and how they kind of weigh their decision to use our tools, given what is going on with Apple. The short answer, and then I will let Mike add on, is that they are still going to use our tools even though they're creating content for Apple. So, basically to create -- those 6 million creative professionals, they are also going to still use our tools. We don't think there is going to be an impact to our creative suite tools as a result of this change from Apple. What it basically means though is they have two workflows now, one to create content for the Apple devices and one to create content for everything else. I think that is a little bit of the misconception out there -- is that people will not use our creative tools for Apple devices. But the truth is they will; they're just going to have two workflows.

Saviage said:

Just building on that, it goes back to the workflow. People live everyday in products like Photoshop and Illustrator and InDesign. We're the leading provider of HTML authoring tools in the world for professionals with Dreamweaver. Almost all of the HTML content that you interact with when you go to a website and open up a website with a browser is created or touched with Adobe technology. Our customers are telling us that doesn't change whatsoever, despite Apple's motives or goals around Flash.

At the end of that workflow, they push buttons. Those buttons create prints; they create PDF; they create HTML; they create Flash; they create video, whatever the formats of choice of by consumers interacting with that content on the web. That is the output of our tools. Whatever formats are the formats of the future, Adobe will support those, including HTML 5. Adobe will be the best tool provider in the world for HTML 5 contents when HTML 5 is ready. The fact of the matter is it's nowhere close to being ready today. There is very little browser support for it, and customers can't create content using some of the new innovation in HTML 5 until there's broader adoption by users with the browsers of choice, whether it is on a PC or a non-PC. We want help our customers get to that point, but it is going to take years, not a matter of weeks or months.

Saviage also kicked around HTML 5:

There is very little HTML 5 and that's on the web. All of those 200,000 applications that Apple talks about, those are all written in Objective-C and C code. None of that is being done in HTML 5 today. When you go to a browser, when you go to a website and a browser, there's tests starting to be done to provide alternatives using HTML 5. But there's only two browsers today that support HTML 5, Safari and the Mac. Google Chrome supports some aspect of it in Windows. So until there's broader support for HTML 5, the browsers are not going to implement full-fledged support for it. The issue is that HTML 5 is still in the specification design stages, and we're a long way away from getting agreement around things like which video compression technology to use and agreements around some of the other technologies. So it sort of a chicken and egg situation.

More: Apple vs. Adobe on antitrust: Should regulators dictate what’s in an SDK? The debate

Topics: Enterprise Software, Apple, Browser, Software Development

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11 comments
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  • RE: Others are doing it. Why not Adobe?

    Google are creating HTML5 apps. Apple are creating HTML5 apps. Others are creating HTML5 apps.<br><br>Why doesn't Adobe just generate both HTML5 & Flash runtimes from their tools and let their customers decide what they want to use on their websites?

    Adobe already demonstrated HTML5 support in DreamWeaver, in this YouTube video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v69S22ZBBqA

    Plus, there is now a test to determine the level of HTML5 support in each browser. Check it out:
    http://html5test.com/

    I suspect this is why Apple is developing Gianduia. They know Adobe has so much vested interest in Flash that they are unlikely to have the political will to shift their web authoring tools to HTML5.
    linuser
    • RE: Adobe: Apple's anti-Flash moves won't impact Creative Suite; HTML 5 not ready yet

      I have spent much time gritting my teeth over Flash (including ongoing lack of support for x64 browsers, not to mention the propensity for enabling the vast number of poorly encoded websites with bad flash-based content out there), <a href="http://www.customdissertationwritinghelp.co.uk/services/">dissertation services</a> I do think they may be wise in stepping back in this case, to at least wait to see where exactly the HTML5 cards will fall, and what the accepted practices will be... 'cause let's face it.
      adamjones342
  • Scribd turned to HTML5 last week; ***Adobe LIES*** as usual

    Even IE supports some HTML5 features; and, of course, FF and Opera.

    So Adobe again lies.
    DDERSSS
    • Most important point to remember in "support for HTML5" claims...

      @denisrs

      Remember that at this point [b]there are NO HTML5 standards as recognised by WC3 beyond draft format.[/b] Attempts were made last year to get major players (namely Apple, Google, Mozilla, Opera & Microsoft - although interestingly, MS was a lesser player in the final fallout) to agree on common benchmarks and standards, but that fell to a heap when parties failed to agree due to individual vested interests in varying formats. Thus official "standards" are not yet set in stone.

      This is important to remember, as what each party holds as "support for HTML5" will vary, as it will depend on their own ideas as to what HTML5 should be entailed as: it almost reminds me of the battle btwn Netscape and IE in their bid to define HTPP core standards and protocols, only with more players!

      As much as I have spent much time gritting my teeth over Flash (including ongoing lack of support for x64 browsers, not to mention the propensity for enabling the vast number of poorly encoded websites with bad flash-based content out there), I do think they may be wise in stepping back in this case, to at least wait to see where exactly the HTML5 cards will fall, and what the accepted practices will be... 'cause let's face it; the rules are, as yet, hardly set in stone!
      kaninelupus
  • That's the spirit

    I think adobe needs to mentally revisit macromedia's old motto "what the web can be" - these kinds of points are excactly how they should be responding to the hysteria. Apple are risking more in the long run, because the web will catch up with the App store, then it will have little differentiating advantage. And adobe will still be there, fueling the web. In the short term, the iPad is annoying to use for web surfing - see the comments on this site http://flash4ipad.com and ripe for competitors to launch in good time with cheaper, more able, products.
    paul@...
  • Based on FlashCamp...

    Flash is not ready for mobile by a long long way.
    Bruizer
  • RE: Adobe: Apple's anti-Flash moves won't impact Creative Suite; HTML 5 not

    Apple's anti-flash doesn't affect the bulk of the market since Apple doesn't care about any platform but their own - which doesn't make up the greater percentage of the market of computer/smart device users. Of course, Adobe could use a kick in the pants to stream line Flash so it doesn't need so many resources.
    jumpsinpuddles
    • "Apple's antiflash" does not, but the **ugly** Flash itself does

      @jumpsinpuddles: I mean just last week Opera folks confirmed that one could cook an egg on device that would ran Flash.

      Id est: of course, some devices will run Flash, but it will make those devices half useless because of battery drain.
      DDERSSS
  • Unbelievable Case of Head in the Sand

    Adobe is so on the defensive that they're ignoring reality.

    1) EVERYONE is scrambling to implement HTML5 because it's obvious this is the future, and no one wants to get left behind.
    2) Adobe CS is the most overpriced software on the market.
    3) Adobe's code base is stale--bulky, slow, prone to crash.
    4) Creatives in my circle are itching to design on an iPad or something from Apple just like it.

    The net result spells O-P-P-O-R-T-U-N-I-T-Y in big red letters for the first company that comes up with a viable product. Adobe enjoys a lead right now, but this game is in the fourth quarter, and the time is ticking down.
    tomogden
    • Points in question..

      @tomogden <br>1) What do you define as "over-priced"? <br>Value depends on a software packages deemed worth, not a price-tag. While the cost of the CS5 (or lesser SKU) may seem high in your opinion, compare the following links for prices on the premium Autodesk products, which I have nothing but respect for as a user:<br><a href="http://store.autodesk.com/DRHM/servlet/ControllerServlet?SiteID=adsk&Locale=en_US&Action=DisplayProductDetailsPage&productID=187051300&pgm=12938000&ThemeID=1293100&Currency=USD&resid=S-FBoQoHAiwAACwPg14AAAAN&rests=1274102176430" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://store.autodesk.com/DRHM/servlet/ControllerServlet?SiteID=adsk&Locale=en_US&Action=DisplayProductDetailsPage&productID=187051300&pgm=12938000&ThemeID=1293100&Currency=USD&resid=S-FBoQoHAiwAACwPg14AAAAN&rests=1274102176430</a><br><a href="http://store.autodesk.com/DRHM/servlet/ControllerServlet?Action=DisplayProductDetailsPage&SiteID=adsk&Locale=en_US&ThemeID=1293100&Env=BASE&productID=185164700" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://store.autodesk.com/DRHM/servlet/ControllerServlet?Action=DisplayProductDetailsPage&SiteID=adsk&Locale=en_US&ThemeID=1293100&Env=BASE&productID=185164700</a><br>Makes the CS5 Suite look cheap do they not? Yet both the CS5 suite and the Autodesk packages are fairly priced based on productivity. Sure there are "FOSS" equivalents, but let's face it; they're free for a reason!<br><br>2) Jump on the band-wagon about Adobe's reticence about HTML5, but remember that the format is yet lacking in any official standards (beyond the WC3's draft formats). A company the likes of Adobe (which is not one of the key players in pushing for any specific HTML5 "standards"), is actually wise to stand back and wait for the rules to be clearly defined before making any substantial investments in any one direction.
      kaninelupus
  • RE: Adobe: Apple's anti-Flash moves won't impact Creative Suite; HTML 5 not ready yet

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