All-in-one desktops driving demand for 2.5-inch hard drives

All-in-one desktops driving demand for 2.5-inch hard drives

Summary: Besides a smaller form factor, the 2.5-inch hard disk drive offers opportunities for lower power consumption and higher endurance.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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As all-in-one desktop computers become the norm, that's also driving up demand for 2.5-inch hard drives, according to a new report from IHS iSuppli.

But as consumers (and manufacturers) gravitate towards more compact devices, that also means that the standard 3.5-inch hard disk drives are all but on the way out.

Besides its smaller form factor, the 2.5-inch hard disk drive also offers opportunities for lower power consumption and higher endurance. Beyond just all-in-one desktops, they're also typically found now in laptops, external hard drives, and enterprise servers and storage systems.

Fang Zhang, an analyst covering storage systems at IHS, explained in the report just why all-in-one desktop sales seem to be making the difference here:

With a maximum capacity of 1 terabyte, 2.5-inch HDDs are proving very attractive to PC makers for use in their next-generation all-in-one designs. Multiple all-in-one PCs have the potential to adopt 2.5-inch HDDs, including the iMac from Apple Inc., TouchSmart from Hewlett-Packard, Series 7 from Samsung Electronics, IdeaCentre from Lenovo, Top Touchscreen from Asus Eee and all-in-one desktops from Vizio and Acer.

Nevertheless, there is a downside to 2.5-inch hard drives: they cost more. Furthermore, they're currently considerably slower at at 5,400 revolutions per minute (rpm), compared to 7,200 rpm for the 3.5-inch.

Thus, the 3.5-inch HDD is probably safe for now. IHS analysts predict that the hard drive market for all-in-one PCs will continue to be dominated by 3.5-inch discs, with shipments by 2016 estimated at 31 million units. At the same time, they posit that growth will turn out to be much slower over the next four years than for 2.5-inch drives.

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Topic: Hardware

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6 comments
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  • That is so wrong

    [i]Furthermore, they???re currently considerably slower at at 5,400 revolutions per minute (rpm), compared to 7,200 rpm for the 3.5-inch.[/i]

    2.5-inch 7200 laptop drives have been available for years. You really should get your facts straight.
    ScorpioBlack
    • Rachel does not know what she does not know

      But she writes anyway. I was also wondering what a drive's "endurance" is.
      D.T.Long
    • And they're very common at that

      Even the relatively inexpensive ($400.00) Dell Vostro-V131 comes with a 7200 rpm, 320GB drive.
      cHarley1200
    • so did 10,000 rpm on 3.5"

      but it comes down to price for mainstream systems.
      The Linux Geek
    • Older drives

      Older drives were certainly 5400 rpm. Some of the newer (and cheaper) ones are, as well. It really doesn't seem to matter anymore, they've gotten so huge for standard desktop systems it's ridiculous. I still run one system with under 40 G storage and it's just fine. Don't need Windows 7, don't need HD video, don't need massive pictures... that's all just frill.
      janitorman
  • RPM... how about solid state.

    Solid state seems to be the future. After that, probably something similar to the memristor, or memory cube, that can hold persistent data without power, and by design would have much faster read and write
    times.
    janitorman