Amazon Web Services launches Oracle relational database service

Amazon Web Services launches Oracle relational database service

Summary: Amazon Web Services launched its Relational Database Service for Oracle in a move that accommodates licensing within the offering and a bring your own license arrangement.

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Amazon Web Services said Tuesday that it has launched its Relational Database Service (RDS) for Oracle in a move that accommodates licensing within the offering and a bring your own license arrangement.

Amazon's RDS manages database admin tasks such as provisioning, backups, patching and monitoring for Oracle Database 11g Release 2.

The AWS Oracle RDS comes in two flavors:

  • A license included model means that customers don't need separate Oracle license. AWS will license the Oracle database. That service runs 16 cents per hour.
  • In a bring your own license model, customers can run Oracle's database on Amazon's RDS for 11 cents an hour.

Customers can reserve space for database instances or pay by the hour. Amazon has already supported MySQL deployments. Toss in Amazon's partnership with SAP and the company is rapidly becoming an option in many layers of the enterprise technology stack.

Here's the pricing for a standard edition licensing included:

As well as bring your own license:

Topics: Data Management, Amazon, Data Centers, Enterprise Software, Hardware, Networking, Oracle, Software, Storage

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6 comments
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  • How exactly would this model work for customers?

    I'm a sys admin by trade with experience on HP/UX, Solaris, RedHat, Windows, Novell. I'm trying to understand how a customer would use this service. Could someone lay this out for me. Let's say I'm a small/medium sized business with 8 branch offices, 1000 employees and a development and database staff of 20. I currently have several production Oracle 10g database servers running Solaris or RedHat with development and QA/testing environments as well. I'm using Apache/Tomcat for web applications. Question is, how do I leverage this offering from Amazon? How could this work for my company and what are the obvious and not so obvious benefits?
    gigglypuff
    • RE: Amazon Web Services launches Oracle relational database service

      @gigglypuff - typical use case would be for people who host their apps on Amazon EC instances ... you wouldn't typically set TNS names to Amazon DB instances (though if it's like Amazon's other hosted DB offerings, you <i>can</i>). So ... you'd look at firing up Amazon EC images for your Tomcat apps, and running it all off their infrastructure.

      "Benefit" (you'd have to eval if it really is a benefit, in your context) is you can stand down on managing your own infrastructure, move it from capital expenditure to operating expenditure (which has accounting benefits of its own), and often you can reduce/re-target a portion of your IT staff.
      daboochmeister
      • Agreed...

        Most of the time, cloud DB offerings are more piggyback solutions to cloud apps.

        Another way to leverage a cloud solution would be in mobile apps. Instead of opening your firewall to mobile devices, you could replicate your database on the cloud, and create SOA endpoints in Java (on a Amazon EC instance).

        Those same endpoints can be replicated on your local servers, and the mobile app can detect if it's working over the air (3G) or on a secure network (WiFi or VPN).

        The problem's the overhead created by the replication and the need for separate realms for data.
        cosuna
  • RE: Amazon Web Services launches Oracle relational database service

    Sounds messy.
    james347
  • RE: Amazon Web Services launches Oracle relational database service

    I agree with you james. It looks like <a href="http://www.medicalterminology.ca">medical terminology</a>, it sounds like a chemical name or an <a href="http://www.irishnames.ca">Irish names</a>. It is also as complicated but organized as <a href="http://www.postalcodestoronto.ca">postal codes Toronto</a>.
    trevor047
  • Nice!

    Perfect post. Here???s a tool that lets youbuild your cloud database apps without codinghttp://www.caspio.com/
    lawtonterri