AMD desktop chips score grand slam against Intel in tests

AMD desktop chips score grand slam against Intel in tests

Summary: AMD appears to be cleaning the bases when its top end chips are pitted against those of Intel on both performance and features.

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TOPICS: Processors
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AMD appears to be cleaning the bases when its top end chips are pitted against those of Intel on both performance and features.

Topic: Processors

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8 comments
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  • Experience matters. Paper doesn't always mean skill...

    I once had to interview 8 people for a rather intense support position. Of the 8, 6 were MCSE's.

    Every one of the MCSE's fell flat on their interviews for technical ability.

    They had paper but NO skill whatsoever.

    We ended up hiring a person with NO paper yet a strong 5 years of street experience. It worked out well...
    BitTwiddler
    • Well... you do know what MSCE stands for, don't you?

      MSCE: Must Consult Someone Else
      B.O.F.H.
      • Others

        Must Consult Someone Experienced
        Multiple Choice Selection Expert
        Microsoft Certified Shutdown Engineer
        Minesweeper Consultant And Solitaire Expert


        ;)
        toadlife
    • Ain't that the truth...

      From what I have seen, the only "certified" people that are worth a damn are those that had the knowledge beforehand and just got the paper "because they had to."
      Patrick Jones
  • AVVID is TERRIBLE...

    for the enterprise. Doesn't scale, doesn't come close to the 9's, and is unsupportable. If I wanted to spend my day loading ES patches from Cisco TAC, changing firmware levels across my enterprise, causing more incompatibilities and outages because of it, just because I am Cisco certified - you're crazy. Yeah - there's tons of work to be had - but is it work worth doing?

    Hahah - not to me.
    jf1225
  • Certification, Experience, or Education?

    In my humble opinion, I believe the intent of the certification system is far different than reality. Instead of supplementing one's skills and education, it becomes, the way to enter a technology position/career without experience. It aggravates those who have proven experience, formal education, and a well-rounded skill set.

    Nothing I have seen from any of the certifications will assist a person to become eligible for a higher management position, a real system analysis position, or try to teach the concepts.

    Shouldn't an MCSE, CNE, or CCNP, have a basic understanding of the responsibilities an accouting, law, logistics, and manufacturing to an organization?

    Where is the value to an organization if an expensive certified consultant has less capabilities or understanding of than a mail clerk that has ideas how to reduce shipping costs and increase market share?

    CNP was a well rounded certfication about network technology, that focused on concepts and well rounded skills (windows, unix, novell, apple, and OS/2), but it died.

    Why do Microsoft, Cisco, Novell have the ability to strip you of your career when they release a new product? Does one's brain simply become erased and they are no longer capable of anything? If you wanted to change careers, such as become a high school physical education teacher, these certifications mean nothing.

    A formal college education, is by far much more powerful in the long term. A CEO, attorney, CPA, HR specialists, and most management understand and relate to completing a bachelors, masters, MBA, or Ph.D. These people are the ones that promote to the higher positions in the company.

    A formal education doesn't disappear every few years, cannot be easily revoked, and not capable to achieve in a 7 day "Boot Camp".

    I wonder how much revenue is generated by these certification programs to Microsoft, Cisco, Novell, Lotus, etc?? I am sure these certification programs increase the presence of related products from that company.

    I notice candidates with the experience and formal education are more attractive. They can communicate with good english, use business terms, and explain their sucesses in the value to the business.

    Candidate A:I installed IIS for xyz.
    Candidate B:Worked with customers to install an extranet for JIT orders. Used IIS for web and ftp.

    My $.02

    RainmanX
    RainmanX
  • Experience is everything

    A cert without experience means you are a motivated newby who read a lot. A cert with good experience is like the icing on a cake.
    xelaju
  • We implimented Cisco VOIP...

    ...using all of the technology mentioned in this article. We had a third party company who's workers were supposedly certified in this area do the initial install of the entire system. They got it to work but didn't do a very good job. We have since learned how the system works ourselves, and had to fix the mess that they made when installing the system. None of us have any of these useless Certs.

    My company does send me to training, but it's not with the aim of getting us certified - it's with the aim of getting me trained. I hold the same attitude. When I go to training, I wan't to learn how to better perform my job, not memorize trivia.
    toadlife