AMD's Turion is for thin and light? Yeah right!

AMD's Turion is for thin and light? Yeah right!

Summary: One sidebar to my last blog -- a discussion of Vista testing as well as a walk down memory lane -- was that when I decided to get an AMD 64-bit Turion-based notebook, my assumption was that I'd be able to find something in the 4-5 pound range.  After all, according to AMD's positioning of the Turion, the 64-bit capable mobile processor is positioned for the thin and light notebook market.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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One sidebar to my last blog -- a discussion of Vista testing as well as a walk down memory lane -- was that when I decided to get an AMD 64-bit Turion-based notebook, my assumption was that I'd be able to find something in the 4-5 pound range.  After all, according to AMD's positioning of the Turion, the 64-bit capable mobile processor is positioned for the thin and light notebook market.  So, I was a bit suprised to learn that the two major US domestic Turion contenders -- Acer's Ferarri 4005 and HP's nx6125 -- wieghed in at 6.2 lbs and 6.0 pounds, respectively.  I purchased the former.  But these are not thin and light notebooks by any stretch of the imagination.  Their closer to being heifers.  So, I wrote to AMD to get it's take on the mismatch between the chip's positioning and the way vendors were using it.  Here's how a spokesperson replied:

You are absolutely correct that AMD Turion 64 mobile technology is designed to deliver industry-leading AMD64 performance in thinner and lighter notebook PCs with longer battery life, enhanced security, and compatibility with the latest wireless and graphics technologies.

However, as a customer-centric company, AMD realizes that there is a wide range of needs and usage models among notebook PC buyers. AMD works with leading chipset and wireless solution partners to develop an ecosystem of best-of-breed technologies, including solutions optimized for thin and light systems. In this way, AMD provides its customers the flexibility to offer mobile solutions that meet the needs of the particular markets they serve, in terms of PC size, weight, features, price, battery life and performance.

In other words, go ahead you notebook manufacturers out there.  Put it in any ole' notebook you please and to heck with the original positioning!  Or, am I missing something?

Topic: Hardware

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6 comments
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  • Jeez, I think you should do more research!!

    Fujitsu sells the Turion MT based Lifebook S2110. At 4lb it is most definately a Thin & Light.

    Averatec is supposed to release one(4100), but it seems that it has been delayed(their website states that it should be available in July 2005).

    HP also has a couple of models with the Turion, Compaq V2000z & the special ed. L2000 weigh around 5.4lb - can also be considered to be borderline Thin & Lights.

    I guess if you look around you can also buy from other ODM's.

    There might not be as many choices as for the Pentium M, but there many decent options.
    miner_z
  • Check out Fujitsu's LifeBook S2110

    It's got the AMD Turion 64, and it's 4 pounds!
    kixster
  • Yeah, you're missing something.

    I just bought a 4 pounder with up to 7 hrs of battery life.

    http://store.shopfujitsu.com/fpc/Ecommerce/buildseriesbean.do?series=S2
    arny27@...
  • You're not the only one.

    IN my opinion, the manufacturers are also missing something.... CUSTOMER OPTIONS. Sure, many people want "Thin and Light" and many people want Long Battery life, but not necessarily both. I don't like tiny screens and I don't need the most powerful processor. I would be EXTREMELY happy with a 7lb notebook that would get me 8hrs runtime on battery power. This is easily possible with ultra-low power processors and large batteries. I would even be happy to pay extra, but no manufacturers offer this.

    BT
    bjterry62
  • Thin may be in, but FAT is where it's at!!

    AMD is catering to the gravitionally challenged segment of the notebook market. Nothing wrong with that...
    Prognosticator
  • Research before you Talk

    There are pleanty of lighter-than-6-pound notebooks that use Turion processors. Take the Compaq V2000Z series for example, here is the site that it is at: http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/computer_series.do?series_name=V2000Z_series&catLevel=2&category=notebooks/compaq_presario&storeName=computer_store
    pswirhun