Barrett's last word: Don't bore the kids

Barrett's last word: Don't bore the kids

Summary: Craig Barrett gave his last Intel Developer Conference keynote, as he heads off into semi-retirement. In May, the 65-year-old Barrett becomes Chairman of the Board, succeeding Andy Grove, and 54-year-old Paul Otellini takes the CEO slot.

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TOPICS: Intel
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barrettCraig Barrett gave his last Intel Developer Conference keynote, as he heads off into semi-retirement. In May, the 65-year-old Barrett becomes Chairman of the Board, succeeding Andy Grove, and 54-year-old Paul Otellini takes the CEO slot. You could call it a generational shift, but both joined Intel in 1974--Barrett from academia and expertise in materials science and Otellini with a degree in economics.

The transition is occurring at time that Intel has tremendous opportunities and challenges. [See ZDNet's full coverage

Topic: Intel

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  • The Education Problem

    Why would any American get a science or technology degree today? All the work is going offshore. People in those fields had their careers crash around them. Now, employers are only hiring people who are currently employed and go even further to require perfect credit. Try being out of work for two years.

    This is seen by the kids and they don't want to see their lives ruined long before retirement. The message is that they would be crazy to pursue a design level career. Thus, they apply themselves elsewhere.

    Sure education is being dumbed down again. Teaching a test is easier than teaching something that requires thought. And, some groups out there want to destroy not only education, but the science that so called secular humanism is built on. It's not enough to believe what they want, but they insist that we bend science to their beliefs.

    The problem isn't education. The problem is the already educated adults. Their behavior drives outsourcing and pseudo-science. I'm happy to see that my son will not involve himself in a technology-driven career even when he has the ability.

    This all started back in the early eighties, so there is much to fix, but we lack the will to try.

    David Locke
    Dave48000
    • Self-fullfilling prophecy?

      "...Why would any American get a science or technology degree today? All the work is going offshore..."

      Good point but it seems like a self fullfilling prophecy. Less americans getting a tech degree equates to less americans available to be hired by american companies.

      It seems to me the future is still in technology in one form or fashion. Not encouraging young americans to learn math & schience basics and to consider technology as a career path is terrible advice.
      Prognosticator
      • Terrible advice?

        So tell me, as a college instructor, how can I possibly encourage anybody to into engineering // computer science. Let's see, you will work harder than your peers and have poor career prospects for your hard work. That is the reality. If there were demand for engineers students would take that course of study. It is not a "self fulfilling prophecy" but business that has decided engineers have no value. Hence, our kids will pursue interests which do seem to have value.
        Art Royce
  • Not a moment too soon

    Take the "semi" status off Craig Barrett's retirement from Intel. Looking backward--rather than forward---is no surprise from a senior official who played a major role in the "surprise" discovery that the Pentium line was played out, who was a major policymaker of the Itanic disaster.

    What Intel needs--desperately--isn't more of the same from the men who've made the company what it was, Intel needs men and women who can lead the company in intelligent new directions in the remainder of the decade.
    ewilner
    • Barrett is to be commended

      "...discovery that the Pentium line was played out, who was a major policymaker of the Itanic disaster..."

      I disagree "Itanic" is a disaster despite the rhetoric around it's failures to meet volume expectations. It is CPU driving some of the fastest super computers in the world and essential to compete with SPARC and Power proprietary offerings in the high end.

      I credit Barrett for sticking to his guns on Itanium and continuing to take high bet risks that has made Intel what it is today.
      Prognosticator
  • Get a clue

    It's nice to say how badly America needs highly educated engineers, but they have no future here. Please read the previous sentence again. I started out as an engineer who graduated from a top ten school. I even have one of those "cute" PE licenses. It's in a filing cabinet somewhere. I got frustrated with companies going out of business or being bought out so I went into the computing field. Bad move - I would be better off fixing cars. All the interesting jobs are going overseas. There is NO WAY Americans can compete with low-cost highly educated white collar labor. That just is not going to happen. My Java course was cancelled this term (I teach part time) due to lack of interest. Oh yeah, I forgot I have an M.S. degree from another highly regarded institution. American industry has determined that science and technology is a low value occupation. That is simply the reality.

    I am currently studying Chinese in hopes of getting involved in trade or technology with them. I cannot stop the inevitable, but maybe I can find a few years of work out of it. Someday America will probably need engineers. Too bad, we will have to outsource as we won't have any left.
    Art Royce
  • The loss of our Technology...

    American Technology has enabled our country to be the strongest nation on earth. Now I fear that we are exporting our deepest secrets to highly skilled (foreign) engineers who will ultimately lead other nations to compete against us - using that knowledge.

    Slowly they will leave with our offshore engineering labs with that knowledge. I fear America will become the new third world nation.

    Our CEOs and Board of Directors will then be scratching their heads wondering how this could possibly happen. And to think we pay them hundreds of millions of dollars...

    The comments made in here are absolutely correct.
    Greg
    RoadRunner_z